Sunday, 30 September 2012

The Daily Teaser — 30-09-2012

Oh, so THAT’S what it is … !

Hmmm … 

Mind me sharing something, at this point … ?

Lord knows why, but I’ve had the word prebendary floating around my head all morning.

Turn’s out it’s a kind of Canon: and one associated with cathedral administration.   And with a non-regular source of income.

Hmmm … 

Well, that’s that settled, then.

Personally, I think walking in and announcing you’re a prebendary will get you some funny looks, at parties.

But let’s get moving on, shall we?

Before things get strange … 

««•»»

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: along with admitting she found the amount of stairs in the UK and Ireland to be rather boggling, also bagging 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 


Q1) 30th September, 1955, saw the death of actor, James Dean, in a car crash: what make of car was he driving, at the time … ?
Q2) 30th September, 1967, saw the BBC’s Home Service Radio station become what … ?
Q3) 30th September, 1990, saw the Dalai Lama unveil a statue in the Canadian capital city: what IS the Canadian capital city … ?
Q4) 30th October 1994, saw the closure of what was the furthest tube station from central London: which station was it …?
Q5) And finally … that same day, 30th September, 1994, saw the closure of Aldwych station: Aldwych had originally been named what … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …

Q1) 29th September is the date of Michælmas: otherwise known as the Feast of Saint Michæl and All … what … ?
A1) Angels.
Q2) More to the point, Saint Michæl the Archangel is the patron saint of which Ukrainian city … ?
A2) Kiev.
Q3) Moving on … 29th September, 1650, saw Henry Robinson publish his The Office of Addresses and Encounters, in Threadneedle Street: what financial institution is in Threadneedle Street … ?
A3) The Bank of England.
Q4) 29th September, 1960, saw who famously lose his temper at a UN General Assembly meeting … ?
A4) Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev.
Q5) 29th September, 1971, saw which sultanate join the Arab League: Brunei, Oman or Malacca … ?
A5) Oman.
Q6) And finally … 29th September, 2004, saw asteroid 4179 Toutatis pass very close to Earth: the asteroid is named after a god in which mythology?
A6) Celtic.
Enjoy that lot.

I’ll leave you with this quote from Truman Capote … 

“Disco is the best floor show in town. It's very democratic, boys with boys, girls with girls, girls with boys, blacks and whites, capitalists and Marxists, Chinese and everything else, all in one big mix.”
Truman Capote September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984

And with this tune, as well: as it’s pianist, Donald Swann’s birthday … 



























*        Actually, there’s a reason for the stairs at most stations in the UK, Debbi: when they built the railway, back when Queen Victoria was on the throne, the railway companies kept the track on one level, over the course of several hundred miles.   The net result is tons of cuttings — you and Rick went through at Brentwood: all those embankments by the track, as you headed for Liverpool Street? — and tons of stairs.   Mostly where the platforms were higher or lower than the ground outside the stationº … 

º        Oh … COMPLETELY off thread, here, Debbi, I take it you caught last night’s episode … ?

Saturday, 29 September 2012

Dr Who — Episode 5 Series 7: The Angels Take Manhatten

You know, it’s got to be said, current Dr Who show-runner, Steven Moffat, is going down like Marmite on toast.

Fans either love him, or hate him: and if it’s the latter, tend to behave very badly.

That’s why he felt compelled, a few weeks ago, to leave Twitter: from the talk going around, he’d left due to some seriously nasty comments he was getting from some quarters.

Some, downright threatening.

Personally … ?

Personally, I know Mr M has his bad days —Asylum of the Daleks was good, but not necessarily his most stunning moment — and good days.

I’m happy to cut the man some slack.

Mostly because, when Steven Moffat’s good days turn up, they make you remember why you fell in love with his take on the show.

Tonight’s episode of Dr Who, The Angels Take Manhattan … ?

I think I can safely say The Angels Take Manhattan is one of Steven Moffat’s better days.

~~~~~

The Angels Take Manhattan sees the Dr Amy and Rory in 21st century New York, enjoying some much needed down time.

When Rory — suddenly — goes missing whilst try to find some of New York’s finest coffee.

Of course, what we realise … ?   Is that Rory’s actually been found by baby Weeping Angels.   And, as part of the Angels usual feeding routine, sent back in time.

It’s only when the Doctor, Amy and River — who’s been in 1938 New York, disguised as private eye, Melody Malone — get back to 1938, they realise that the Weeping Angels have turned an office block in New York — the Winter Quay building — in to a farm.

And it’s only then that Amy and Rory realise quite what they have to do, to wipe out the threat from the Angels.





~~~~~

Now …

I was saying about better days … ?

Lord, yes.   I’m thinking The Angels Take Manhattan is definitely one of those: for both Steven Moffat and the series regulars

Indeed, I believe this to be an all-round triumph for them all.

Now, I know I’ve possibly annoyed some people: that’s their issue, I think.

But being frank, here, I believe Moffat’s turn in a steamingly good episode.

I’ll let you tell me if you think otherwise: and leave you with this …


Oh, and just so you know what’s on between now and Christmas …

The Daily Teaser — 29-09-2012

Hmm … 

That’s a worry … 

Remember, in yesterday’s Teaser, I asked a question about the Ulster Covenant?   That was the document — signed by many Loyalist members of the community in what’s now Northern Ireland — that protested against Irish Home Rule.

Well, the MARCHES to commemorate that signing are today.

Given this is Northern Island we’re talking about … ?

Given that, it’s understandable that’s lead to the biggest police operation in the area, for years.

I’m hoping for two things: that the police operation works.

And that nobody starts anything.

The last thing I want is something to kickstart the Troubles.

Let’s get moving on, shall we … ?   Before things get depressing … 

~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi putting in her answers: along with telling us she’s (understandably) cautious around escalatorsº, she also managed to score 5 out of 5.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, license and video … 

Q1) 29th September is the date of Michælmas: otherwise known as the Feast of Saint Michæl and All … what … ?
Q2) More to the point, Saint Michæl the Archangel is the patron saint of which Ukrainian city … ?
Q3) Moving on … 29th September, 1650, saw Henry Robinson publish his The Office of Addresses and Encounters, in Threadneedle Street: what financial institution is in Threadneedle Street … ?
Q4) 29th September, 1960, saw who famously lose his temper at a UN General Assembly meeting … ?
Q5) 29th September, 1971, saw which sultanate join the Arab League: Brunei, Oman or Malacca … ?
Q6) And finally … 29th September, 2004, saw asteroid 4179 Toutatis pass very close to Earth: the asteroid is named after a god in which mythology?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 28th September, 1746, saw the birth of Sir William Jones: was he a philosopher, philatelist or philologist … ?
A1) A philologist.
Q2) 28th September — in 1836 — also saw the birth of plumber and inventor, Sir Thomas Crapper: what device did he help to popularize … ?
A2) The Flushing Toilet.   (His floating ballcocks are also highly regarded.)
Q3) 28th September, 1912, saw the signing of the Ulster Covenant.   What was this in opposition to: Irish Home Rule, the Irish Catholic Church, or the Corn Law … ?
A3) Irish Home Rule: the third Irish Home Rule Bill, in fact.
Q4) 28th September, 1939, saw Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia agree to divide what … ?
A4) Poland.
Q5) And finally … 28th September, 1066, saw who lead an invasion of England … ?
A5) William The Bastard: or Conqueror, if you’re feeling polite.
Enjoy those, everyone.

As a final thing, did you know it’s The Killer’s birthday … ?   And that of former Italian Prime Minister, Silvio Berlusconi … ?   (Jerry Lee’s older, by a year.)

With that in mind, I’m going to leave you with this tune.


And with this quote … 
“Mussolini never killed anyone, he just sent dissenters abroad for vacation.”
Silvio Berlusconi* born 29 September 1936












*        Italy elected this guy … ?

º        And I can’t say I blame you, Debbi!   (I alway’s judge escalators by the ones on the London Underground: they’re huge.   And it’s only in the past couple of decades that the old wooden ones have been replaced: there’s only one left … )

Friday, 28 September 2012

The Friday Question Set — 28-09-2012

You know, I THINK I’m going to have to do some explaining, here, aren’t I … ? 

I think … !

You see, in case you’ve not realised it, I’ve had some quiz questions published in this week’s Brentwood Gazette, under under its current editor, Neville Wilson, Gazette People banner.

Now … 



I’m hoping I’ve a few new readers as a result of those questions.

Welcome to Nik Nak’s Old Peculiar.

I’m Nik Nak, and the bio in the paper is fairly accurate.

I’m literally both job hunting, and a recovering barman.

And pub-quiz master for hire.

I also write the Daily Teaser, which is a fun daily brain teaser: there’s no prizes … beyond the sheer joy of solving a (hopefully) challenging puzzle.

I should also add that I’m a quiz master for hire.   I’ll happily run at quiz at your venue — if we can agree a time and price.   And if I can get there.

I also write pub quizzes: and release them here, every Friday.  They’re free to use.

All I ask is that you give me an author’s credit, and tell people where you got them … and if you republish them, you do so under the same Creative Commons License I use.

Actually … ?

Talking of the Friday Question set, let’s get down to business, shall we … ?

Here’s today’s set: along with that License I mentioned …
Online 170   
ROUND ONE.   GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.   
Q1) In the famous cartoons, what bird does Wile E Coyote chase but never catch?   
A1) Road  Runner.
Q2) Where on your body are the Mounts of the Sun, Mercury and Venus?   
Q2) Your hand.   They’re the various parts of your palm.
Q3) How many times a day do Muslims have to pray: 4, 5 or 6?   
A3) 5.
Q4) In mythology, what made Perseus invisible: His cloak, his helmet, or his toga?   
A4) His helmet.
Q5) What is Cherie Blair’s maiden name?   
A5) Cherie Booth.
Q6) Which is the lower house in British politics?   
A6) The House of Commons.
Q7) Who is Watford grammar school’s most famous old girl: Sarah Ferguson or Geri Halliwell?   
A7) Geri Halliwell.
Q8) What is a quirt: a hammer, a whip or a noose?   
A8) A Whip.
Q9) Which word can mean trousers and breathes heavily?   
A9) PANTS.
Q10) What word can go after SPECIAL and before LINE?   
A10) BRANCH.
ROUND TWO.   BY THE NUMBERS.   
Q11) How many islands are there in the Hawaiian group: 19, 29 or 39?   
A11) 19.
Q12) In wedding anniversaries, what an 11 anniversary: Paper, Lace or Steel?   
A12) Steel.
Q13) How many pairs of shoes did Imelda Marcos own: 2000, 3000, or 4000?   
A13) 3000.
Q14) How many drivers take part in each formula one Grand Prix race: 18, 20, or 22?   
A14) 22.
Q15) From how many miles can polar bears smell humans: 10, 20, or 30?   
A15) 20.
Q16) How many islands are in the Bissagos group: 15, 150 or 1500?   
A16) 15.
Q17) How many points does a Sycamore leaf haveL 4, 5, or 6?   
A17) 5.
Q18) How many other people has the average glass of London tap water passed through: 3, 9 or 12?   
A18) 9.
Q19) Which number is considered unlucky in Japan: 4, 7, or 11?   
A19) 4.
Q20) US Military intelligence, is set to use real sharks fitted with electronic chips in their brains, to spy on enemy ships. The distance of the frequency that the sharks will send signals from will be how long; – 20 miles, 200 miles, or 2000 miles?   
A20) 200 miles.
ROUND THREE.   BLINDED WITH SCIENCE.   
Q21) According a two year American study, The commercially named drug Crestor has been proven to beat certain types of which disease?   
A21) Heart disease.
Q22) Which planetary satellite did the space probe SMART 1 recently crash into?   
A22) The Moon.
Q23) What protein is cartilage made up of?   
A23) Collagen.
Q24) What would happen to you if you took an emetic?   
A24) You’d vomit.
Q25) What is the atomic number of copper: 23, 26, or 29?   
A25) 29.
Q26) What does a deltiologist study: soap, postcards, or hedgehogs?   
A26) Postcards.
Q27) Which gaseous element has the atomic number 1?   
A27) Hydrogen.
Q28) What term would you use to describe any flying object that hasn’t been identified as a natural or man-made entity?   
A28) U.F.O.
Q29) What is the atomic number of Plutonium: 94, 99, or 104?   
A29) 94.
Q30) In the metric system, what is a micro: a thousandth, a millionth or a billionth?   
A30) A millionth.
ROUND FOUR.   MUSIC & LIGHTS.   
Q31) The Jacket that inspired The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper album was sold at auction recently for £100, 000.   But which member of The Beatles first wore said item?   
A31) John Lennon.
Q32) Which country won the 2007 Eurovision Song Contest?   
A32) Serbia.
Q33) Trevor Smith is the real name of which rapper?   
A33) Busta Rhymes.
Q34) Who provides the voice of Michael Caine, for the Madness hit, Michael Caine?   
A34) Michael Caine.
Q35) Which British band won the Eurovision Song Contest with Making Your Mind Up?   
A35) Bucks Fizz.
Q36) Jason Mizell was better known as which member of Run DMC?   
A36) Jam Master Jay.
Q37) How many symphonies did Brahms write: 4, 5, or 6?   
A37) 4.
Q38) 1992 single, Cop Killer was by which rapper?   
A38) Ice-T.
Q39) Born in the USA,” by Bruce Stringsteen, was written about which war?   
A39) The Vietnam War
Q40) 3 Feet High & Rising, was the debut album by which rap band?   
A40) De La Soul.
ROUND FIVE.   FOOTBALL CRAZY.   
Q41) Which football team play their home games at Gaye Meadow?   
A41) Shrewsbury Town FC.
Q42) Which former England football manager has also managed Ipswich, Porto, Barcelona and Newcastle?   
A42) Bobby Robson.
Q43) Did Jimmy Greaves ever play in a World Cup Final?   
A43) No.
Q44) Who won the last world cup of the 20th Century?   
A44) France.
Q45) Which European country did Berti Vogts manage?   
A45) Germany.
Q46) Which ex-World Cup manager’s autobiography is called An Englishman Abroad?   
A46) Bobby Robson.
Q47) Who was sent off, in France ’98, and fled to his wife, in New York?   
A47) David Beckham.
Q48) Who became sarcastically known as The Hand Of God?   
A48) Diego Maradona.  (Accept Maradona, or “That Argentine bastard!”)
Q49) At which stadium do West Ham United play their home games?   
A49) The Boleyn Ground.
Q50) Which team played at the Old Showground?   
A50) Scunthorpe United.
ROUND SIX.   GENERAL IGNORANCE.   
Q51) Victorian era photographs are often called what tone?   
A51) Sepia
Q52) What do the initials R.A.D.A represent?   
A52) Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.
Q53) How many carats are there  in pure gold: 12, 24 or 36?   
A53) 24
Q54) Which model was named the best dressed woman in the world for 2006, by Tatler magazine?   
A54) Kate Moss.
Q55) What, according to the proverb, does Familiarity breed?   
A55) Contempt
Q56) What is a Killick; – a small climbing hook, a small axe, or a small anchor?   
A56) A small anchor
Q57) What was the most popular baby girl’s name of 2005: Hannah, Jane, or Emily?   
A57) Emily
Q58) Who is older: Phil Collins or Robbie Coltrane?   
A58) Robbie Coltrane
Q59) Who rush in, where Angels fear to tread?   
A59) Fools
Q60) Is a quadrogenarian in their 30s, 40s or 50s.   
A60) Their 40s

Enjoy those, everyone: I hope those are useful.

The Daily Teaser — 28-09-2012

Oh, BOY … !

Am I glad of the existence of Radio 4, or what … !

Well, yeah … 

Right at the moment, the Today Programme has it’s usual Thought For the Day: complete with Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sachs, telling us about the feast of Tabernacles.

Which actually makes of a quietly civilised alternative on BBC 1’s Breakfast news.

Seemingly, The Nolans — the early 80s version of B*Witched — have been dug up for another tour.

Actually … 

Lead singer, Bernie, was rather cute, I might just turn over: I’ll let you knowª … !

Let’s get moving on, shall we?


‹‹·››

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi putting in her answers: and, along with telling us about how she managed to injure her chin*, also managed to bag 9 out of 9.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 28th September, 1746, saw the birth of Sir William Jones: was he a philosopher, philatelist or philologist … ?
Q2) 28th September — in 1836 — also saw the birth of plumber and inventor, Sir Thomas Crapper: what device did he help to popularize … ?
Q3) 28th September, 1912, saw the signing of the Ulster Covenant.   What was this in opposition to: Irish Home Rule, the Irish Catholic Church, or the Corn Law … ?
Q4) 28th September, 1939, saw Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia agree to divide what … ?
Q5) And finally … 28th September, 1066, saw who lead an invasion of England … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 27th September, 1822, saw Jean-François Champollion announce he’d translated the Rosetta Stone: how many scripts featured on that stone … ?
A1) Three.
Q2) Name one of them.
A2) Ancient Greek, Demotic and Egyptian hieroglyphs.
Q3) The Egyptian town of Rosetta is now called what … ?
A3) Rashid.
Q4) As a final Rosetta question … in which Museum has the Stone been displayed, since 1802 … ?
A4) The British Museum.
Q5) Moving on … 27th September, 1970, saw Yasser Arafat — on behalf of the PLO — sign a peace treaty with which Arab nation … ?
A5) Jordan.
Q6) 27th September, 2003, saw the launch of the SMART-1 satellite.   What did the satellite eventually orbit … ?
A6) The moon.
Q7) More to the point, who launched that satellite … ?
A7) The European Space Agency, or ESA.
Q8) 27th September, 2008, saw Zhai Zhigang become the first Chinese person to perform a what: heart transplant, space walk or one-man performance of A Christmas Carol … ?
A8) Spacewalkº.
Q9) And finally … 27th September, 2011, saw the death of writer, David Croft: name either of the series that he co-wrote with Jimmy Perry, that were set in WW2.
A9) Dad’s Army or It Ain’t Half Hot, Mum.
Enjoy those, everyone.

I’ll leave you with this quote from Burlesque artist, Dita von Teese …
“You know how some celebrities have fans of the opposite sex, who imagine they’re going to marry them and live happily ever after? I have a different thing. Over the past 15 years I’ve had a few female fans who’ve gone overboard and been upset because we didn’t become best friends and go shopping together.”
Dita Von Teese, born 28th September, 1972.
And with this tune from Koko Taylor: who’d’ve been 84, today, had he lived … 

























*        Yes, I remember you mentioning it, now, Debbi: that sounds nasty … !

º        Actually … ?   Seeing a Chinese astronaut doing a one-man Dickens show, doing a spacewalk would’ve been one HELL of a show … !

ª        Oh, no, wait, HANG on … The Curiosity Rover’s founded rounded pebbles … 

Thursday, 27 September 2012

The Cabin In The Woods: Fun And Games

You know … 

It HAS been a while since I’ve sat down and watched a movie, it really has.

But I also have to admit, I have managed to catch one, just last night.

The recent DVD release, that is The Cabin In The Woods.   And I’m thinking … well … 

All sorts of things … 

»»·««

The Cabin In The Woods sees five teenage friends — Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Anna Hutchison, Fran Kranz and Jesse Williams as Dana, Curt, Jules, Marty and  Holden, respectively — all deciding to camp out in a small rural — deeply rural — cabin of the film’s title.

Little knowing, as they end up having to explore the inevitable cellar, that they’s being watched by some all too human intelligences intent on sacrificing them to some seriously nasty pieces of work.

And what’s more … ?

In all sorts of entertaining ways … 

»»·««

Now … ?

Was The Cabin In The Woods any good, I here you ask … ?

I’d’ve said so.

OK, granted, it’s not exactly a stunning original piece of work: the basic premise is a twist on The Evil Dead.

But there’s enough gore, snappyish dialogue and trainspottery references* to other films to keep most of us occupied for hours.

It’s certainly no heavy weight.   But does offer an interesting twist on the idea that we’re being watched  by an evil conspiracy.

Let me know what you think, if you do see it.
The Cabin In The Woods   
★★☆☆









*        I spotted ones to The Strangers, Hellraiser, Jaws, The Evil Dead, practically everything George A Romero ever made, AND Orphan

The Daily Teaser — 27-09-2012

Argh … !

Paperwork, paperwork, PAPERWORK …  !

One could go MAD … !

Sort of … !

I’ll be frank, I’ve got some paperwork to do: you hadn’t guessed, had you … ?

One batch for my local council: to make sure my housing benefit goes through.

The other … Is for the county council, after I tripped over, on Tuesday.

When it turns up … !

Let’s get moving on, shall we?   It’s a case of Hurry up and wait, at the moment … 

~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debb*i putting in her answers: and along with admitting she thoroughly enjoyed yesterday’s Bryan Ferry videos, also bagged 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Teaser, shall we?   Here’s those questions, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 27th September, 1822, saw Jean-François Champollion announce he’d translated the Rosetta Stone: how many scripts featured on that stone … ?
Q2) Name one of them.
Q3) The Egyptian town of Rosetta is now called what … ?
Q4) As a final Rosetta question … in which Museum has the Stone been displayed, since 1802 … ?
Q5) Moving on … 27th September, 1970, saw Yasser Arafat — on behalf of the PLO — sign a peace treaty with which Arab nation … ?
Q6) 27th September, 2003, saw the launch of the SMART-1 satellite.   What did the satellite eventually orbit … ?
Q7) More to the point, who launched that satellite … ?
Q8) 27th September, 2008, saw Zhai Zhigang become the first Chinese person to perform a what: heart transplant, space walk or one-man performance of A Christmas Carol … ?
Q9) And finally … 27th September, 2011, saw the death of writer, David Croft: name either of the series that he co-wrote with Jimmy Perry, that were set in WW2.
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 26th September is the Day of the National Flag: in which South American country … ?   
A1) Ecuador.
Q2) More to the point, that flag is made up of three colours: yellow, blue … and what else … ?   
A2) Red.
Q3) 26th September, 1960, saw John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon have the US’s first televised Presidential debate: Kennedy’s last word’s in that debate, were that “Freedom will … ” what … ?   
A3) Conquer.
Q4) 26th September, 1934, saw the launch of the RMS Queen Mary: in which Californian city was the ship a tourist attraction … ?   
A4) Long Beach.
Q5) 26th September, 1950, saw Indonesia join the United Nations: what’s the capital of Indonesia … ?   
A5) Jakarta.
Q6) And finally … 26th September, 1944 saw the failure of Operation Market Garden: this resulted in a British and Polish retreat from which Netherlands city … ?   
A6) Arnhem.
Enjoy those, everyone.   I’ll leave you with this video from Alvin Stardust, doing his best Gene Vincent routine … 


And with this quote from fellow birthday boy, Mr Marvin Lee Aday …
“You're not going to ask me that and if you did I'd pretend that you didn't because everybody and their mother plus their dog and cat and their goldfish asks me that.”
Meat Loaf born 27th September, 1947
















*        Oh, OUCH!   That chin must’ve twanged, then Debbi … !   (I think, by the way, my nose was a lot better than it looks.   Unfortunately, it look pretty messy … !)

Wednesday, 26 September 2012

The Gazette’s Weekly Teaser: Hello, Good Evening, and Welcome.

You know, it’s sort of official … !

I’m now — officially — allowed to come out of the closet.

NO!!!!!!!

Not THAT closet … !

It’s got WAY too much glitter … !

No, the one I’m talking about … ?

Is the one you’d’ve found out about, if you’ve bought this week’s Brentwood Gazette.

More specifically, you’d’ve realised the Gazette’s editor, Neville Wilson, has had a feature called the Gazette People planned for some time.

It’s covering a lot of things.

I know fellow blogger — and history buff — Sylvia Kent’s done a rather good article on the area’s pubs.   Stuart Wilks, from Brentwood Bus and Rail User Association, has put some points in.   With Stephen Mayo and Brian Lynch putting in some seriously hefty article.

And what’s more … ?

What’s more, practically all of us putting in our mini-bios.


Actually … ?   If James Radford’s reading this, I HAVE to say … You know Monopoly was a blatant rip off of The Landlord’s Game … ?   (You’ve got to love Wikipedia, haven’t you … ?)

At ANY rate … 

At any rate, I’m an official Gazette person.

And what’s more, I’ve had some questions published.

To be precise, I’ve had these ones published.
Q1) 26th September is the European Day of Languages, according to whom: UNESCO, the Council of Europe or the International Telecommunications Union … ?
Q2) More to the point, how many full members does that group have … ?
Q3) Moving on … name any of the six modern Celtic languages … 
Q4) More to the point, how many languages are native to the UK … ?
Q5) How many alphabets are native to Europe … ?
Q6) Name one of those alphabets …
Q7) How many official languages are there, in the European Union … ?
Q8) What term is given to a language used as a bridge language, by people who don’t share a common tongue … ?
Q9) Name either of the two European countries where Basque is spoken.
Q10) And finally … What’s the only Semitic language spoken in Europe?

I’ll let you chew those over for the week, shall I … ?

And give you the answers next week.

Neville will kill me, if I give the game away any earlier … !

The Daily Teaser — 26-09-2012

Ouch … 

Ouch, ouch … 

Ouch, ouch, ouch …

I’ve got to admit, I’m in a slight amount of pain.   Did I tell you I headed over to Pilgrims Hatch way, yesterday … ?

Well … 

I actually managed to go head over heels on the way back: over a tree root … !

I went down like lumber.   And looked a sorry sight when I got up.

As you can possibly tell.

I’ll be frank, it’s actually a lot worse than it looks: painful, but healing up.

Even so … ?

I’ve been told — local councillor, Karen Chilvers is a handy person to know, in this sort of thing — that I can pick up a claim form from Brentwood Council.

Nice.

Let’s move on, shall we?   Although, if you know a good solicitor who’s prepared to work pro bono, I’ve got a possible job for him … 

~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi*º putting in her answers: and, along with telling us she’s got some treatment lined up for later, also managed to bag 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 


Q1) 26th September is the Day of the National Flag: in which South American country … ?
Q2) More to the point, that flag is made up of three colours: yellow, blue … and what else … ?
Q3) 26th September, 1960, saw John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon have the US’s first televised Presidential debate: Kennedy’s last word’s in that debate, were that “Freedom will … ” what … ?
Q4) 26th September, 1934, saw the launch of the RMS Queen Mary: in which Californian city was the ship a tourist attraction … ?
Q5) 26th September, 1950, saw Indonesia join the United Nations: what’s the capital of Indonesia … ?
Q6) And finally … 26th September, 1944 saw the failure of Operation Market Garden: this resulted in a British and Polish retreat from which Netherlands city … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 25th September, 1890, saw the US Congress establish Sequoia National Park: in which US state is that park … ?
A1) California.
Q2) More to the point, that park is named for the large number of Sequoia in it: what IS a sequoia … ?
A2) A tree.
Q3) Moving on … 25th September, 2009, saw three G20 Leaders accuse Iran of building a nuclear enrichment facility: name any one of those leaders.
A3) Prime MinisterGordon Brown, President Barack Obama and President Nicholas Sarkozy.
Q4) 25th September, 1066, saw King Harold Godwinson win the Battle of Stamford Bridge: this is traditionally seen as marking the end of which age … ?
A4) The Viking Age.
Q5) 25th September, 1950, saw UN forces capture which Korean city … ?
A5) Seoul.
Q6) And finally … 25th September, 1951, saw the birth of which member of the cast of Star Wars … ?
A6) Mark Hamill.
Enjoy those, everyone: I’ll leave you with this tune from birthday boy, Bryan Ferry … 


Oh … and this one … 


Oh … and this … 


And finally, I’ll leave you with this quote from T. S. Eliot …
“The years between fifty and seventy are the hardest. You are always being asked to do more, and you are not yet decrepit enough to turn them down.”
T. S. Eliot  September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965





















*        Trust me, Debbi, I know EXACTLY what you mean about unbalanced … !   I think my nose tells the story better than I could: bloody tree roots.

º        Actually, talking of Lego’d versions of things: someone’s done a Lego Knights of the Round Table animation … 


It’s ALSO available in Star Trek flavour …