Thursday, 31 January 2013

The Daily Teaser — 31-1-2013

Phew … !

Well, yesterday seemed to go well: comparatively frantically, for me, but well.

Three … no, four post! (One teaser, one for the Gazette, the Gazette one for here, one about Loopers.)

Signing on: and trust me, job-hunting at the moment isn’t easy, there’s not a lot about … !

Oh … And thinking about writing a letter to my local paper … 

Somebody got ticked off by last weeks … !

Hmmm … Let’s move on, shall we?

~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser was quiet: with nobody putting in their answers.

So let’s see who we can persuade to try today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 31st January, 1990, saw the first branch of McDonalds open in Moscow: what’s the name of McDonalds clown mascot … ?
Q2) 5 years later, 31st January, 1995, saw President Bill Clinton make a $20 billion loan to which central American country … ?
Q3) 31st January, 2012, saw which James Cameron film become the first to gross over $2 billion, worldwide … ?
Q4) 31st January, 2000, saw Dr Harold Shipman sentenced to life imprisonment: for killing how many of his patients … ?
Q5) And finally … 31st January, 1930, saw 3M begin selling Scotch Tape.   3M was a contracted version of the company’s original name: which was what … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 30th January saw the assassination of Mohandas K. Gandhi: in which year … ?   
A1) 1948.
Q2) More to the point, by an extremist of which religion … ?   
A2) Hinduism.
Q3) 30th January, 1965, saw which World War Two leader receive a state funeral … ?   
Q4) In which year was that leader named as ‘the Greatest Briton’ by a BBC survey … ?   
A4) 2002.
Q5) 30th January, 1972, saw 13 people killed in the ‘Bloody Sunday’ protests: in which Northern Irish city … ?   
Q6) And finally … 30th January, 1969, saw the last performance by which band … ?   
A6) The Beatles.
Enjoy those, everyone: I’ll leave you with this quote from the late director, Derek Jarman …
“On December 22, 1986, finding I was body positive, I set myself a target: I would disclose my secret and survive Margaret Thatcher. I did. Now I have set my sights on the millennium and a world where we are all equal.”
Derek Jarman  31 January 1942 – 19 February 1994
And a piece performed by the Kronos Quartet: and composed by birthday boy, Phillip Glass … 




Enjoy your day … !

Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Looper: It’s Not About Your Joggers … 

29/1/2013
You know, I think it has to be said, I’ve seen the Rian Johnson film, Looper, tonight.

And as impressive as it is is … ?

For starters, I’m thinking it’s not going to win any Oscars.

Secondly … ?   Secondly, the simple fact is that one of the film’s star — Hollywood veteran, Bruce Willis — is starting to look suspiciously like Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer.

Really.

There’s a thirdly, as well.   I’ve been mulling over the set of ratings I give the films I see: and how giving a four-star rating is increasingly attached to a film I believe you should see, regardless of any objective quality or what I think of it.   Any such film has to be seen: because I think it’s one that you have to make your own mind up about*.

At ANY rate … ?

At any rate, right here and now … ?

I’m thinking Looper isn’t going to be one of those films.

Hmmm … 

Let me grab a good night’s sleep: and I’ll try and summarize … !

~~~~~
30/1/2013
Summarize being the word, I think …

Set in 2044, Looper is the story of Joe Simmons — played by Joseph Gordon-Levittº — who’s the Looper of the title.   In THIS particular universe, some thirty years ahead of the film’s date, time travel has been invented: and declared illegal.

And used quite extensively by the Mafia as a method of disposing of people.

By sending them back in time so they can be shot by the likes of Joe Simmons.

With each Looper being paid with solid silver bars tied to the bound, gagged and masked bodies of the their victims.   Of course, when the Mob feels that a given Looper is getting a touch to old … ?   They send him the masked and bound body of himself, complete with gold bars, to — as the characters call it — close the loop.

Jo Simmons problems start when his old friend Seth loop closing days comes: Seth lets himself go.

And, within a short while … ?

Within a short while, Jo faces the problem of having to deal with the same situation, when his older self —  played by Bruce Willis — is sent back though time to be killed.

Sent back, after having seen his wife killed …

And feeling mightily annoyed about it …

~~~~~

Now …

I was saying ‘… not going to win any Oscars’, wasn’t I … ?

Well … yes …

I’m going to try and avoid sounding harsh, here, so please bear that in mind.

Looper is a fantastic little film, with all four leads doing a fine job of their parts: Emily Blunt and Pierce Gignon rounding out the cast as Sara and her five year old son, Cid, who Young Joe has to protect from his older self.   The writing and dialogue is — likewise — excellent: managing to make what could have been a bloody mess of a time travel plot into something that was both meaty, and easy to follow.

It’s ALSO — in a sense — a very engaging film and watchable film

In that sense, it’s easy to see why Kim Newman — writing in Empire — described it as having “ … a brain, courage and a heart.”

However … 

However, the downside to this, is the simple fact that Looper is something of an exception amongst sci-fi films.

It’s good: but unfortunately attempting to set the bar for intelligent sf that’s already been set — many years ago — by things like 2001: A Space Odyssey, Silent Running and Bladerunner.

Speaking personally, I have to admit, I enjoyed Looper.

It’s a watchable one: but one that left me wanting more: that’s not something I’m totally happy about.
Looper   
★★★☆









*        Yes, Grub, Kevin: I’m talking to you, too … !

º        Who I’d last seen in The Dark Knight Rises: and who — in the makeup, and given I’m thinking having those sort of ideas about Bruce Willis — didn’t half make me think of Danny Dyer … 

The Brentwood Gazette’s Weekly Teaser — 30-1-2013

Hmmm … 

You know, it has to be said, if you take any interest in Brentwood’s local politics, you’ve possibly seen the cover of this weeks Brentwood Gazette.

Complete with reports of the fact that Brentwood Council seems to have lost a bit of a wedge of money.

Frankly … ?   Frankly, Tory turned Independent Councillor Russell Quirk may wish to complain about that.   But, until leaving the council’s Tory group, he was part of the administration that seemingly, lost money.

Hmmm … I think least said soonest mended: but he mite want to remember that, if he’s complaining to the Gazette about Council mishandling.

At ANY rate … ?

This possibly isn’t the place for it.

After all, today is Wednesday, which means the Weekly Teaser.

Here’s this week’s questions …
Q1) 30th January saw the assassination of Mohandas K. Gandhi: in which year of the 1940s … ?   
Q2) More to the point, by an extremist from which religion?   
Q3) What did the K stand for, in Mohandas K Gandhi’s name … ?   
Q4) Gandhi was also known as Mahatma Gandhi.   Mahatma is a nickname meaning what: Big gun, wild tiger or great soul … ?   
Q5) Gandhi achieved fame for helping India achieve independence from the UK: what was the name generally used for British India … ?   
Q6) Who was the first British Emperor/Empress of India … ?   
Q7) Prior to the monarch mentioned in Q6, who ruled India on behalf of Britain: the British West Indian Company, the British East Indian Company or Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank … ?   
Q8) Prior to helping India gain Independence, Gandhi famously organized protests in which African nation: Kenya, Gambia or South Africa … ?   
Q9) Who played Gandhi in the 1982, Richard Attenborough film, ‘Gandhi’?   
Q10) And finally … Which American Civil Right leader was famously inspired by Gandhi: Malcolm X, W. E. B. DuBois or Dr Martin Luther King?  
And here’s last week’s questions and answers.
Questions.   
Q1) 23rd January, 1570, saw the first assassination by gun.   The target was James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray.   Which Scottish King was he the regent for: James 4th, James 5th or James 6th?   
Q2) That Scottish king was also known as which English king … ?   
Q3) How many US presidents have been assassinated … ?   
Q4) Name one of those presidents …    
Q5) Which of those presidents was in office, during the US Civil War … ?   
Q6) Which Russian revolutionary leader was assassinated — with an icepick — in Mexico?   
Q7) Which famous Roman was assassinated by his friend, Brutus, and the subject of a play by William Shakespeare?   
Q8) The third Roman Emperor was the first to be definitely assassinated.   Was he Tiberius, Caligula or Claudius?   
Q9) Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated by a Serb nationalist on 28th June, 1914: this triggered which war … ?   
Q10) And finally … Jean Bastien-Thiry and his fellow members of the OAS attempted to assassinate which French leader?   
Answers.   
A1) James 6th.   
A2) James 1st.   
A3) Four.   
A4) Abraham Lincoln, James Garfield, William McKinley and John F. Kennedy.   
A5) Abraham Lincoln.   
A6) Leon Trotsky.   
A7) Julius Cæsar.   (Gaius Julius Cæsar, to use his full name.   He never achieved the post of Emperor, but WAS the most powerful politician in the Rome of his day: that was his assassins’ motivation.)   
A8) Caligula.   
A9) World War 1.   
A10) General Charles De Gaulle.   (The attempt is what formed the basis of the story ‘The Day Of The Jackal’.)   
Enjoy those: links are on the Gazette’s site … !

The Daily Teaser — 30-1-2013

Busy, busy, busy.

Well … 

Busyish: at least, that’s how today looks at the moment.

I’ve got to sign on at the local job centre: that’s at two thirty.

Oh … and do at least three posts.

Which is on top of my usual job-hunting.

I’d better get a move on, hadn’t I … ?

Here we go … 

~~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbiº putting in her answers: along with writing up her own Teaser*, also managed to bag 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Teaser, shall we?

Here it is, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 30th January saw the assassination of Mohandas K. Gandhi: in which year … ?
Q2) More to the point, by an extremist of which religion … ?
Q3) 30th January, 1965, saw which World War Two leader receive a state funeral … ?
Q4) In which year was that leader named as ‘the Greatest Briton’ by a BBC survey … ?
Q5) 30th January, 1972, saw 13 people killed in the ‘Bloody Sunday’ protests: in which Northern Irish city … ?
Q6) And finally … 30th January, 1969, saw the last performance by which band … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 29th January saw the first publication of Poe’s The Raven.   In which New York newspaper … ?   
Q2) More to the point, in which year was this … ?   
A2) 1845.
Q3) 29th January, 1856, saw Queen Victoria institute the Victoria Cross.   It’s usually announced in the London Gazette: with one exception.   Whom … ?   
A3) The American Unknown Soldier, in 1921.
Q4) During World War 1, 29th January, 1916, saw Paris bombed by what kind of German aircraft … ?   
A4) Zeppelins.
Q5) 29th January. 1976, saw the West End of London bombed by which terrorist group … ?   
A5) The IRA.
Q6) And finally … 29th January, 1819, saw Sir Stamford Raffles land on which island … ?   
A6) Singapore.
We’ll mark the Great Soul’s death with this quote …
“A man is but the product of his thoughts. What he thinks, he becomes.”
Mohandas K. Gandhi 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948
And with a tune from birthday boy, Phil Collins … 













*        Ohh … ! I think I’ll be having a look at that, later, Debbi!   Although I doubt I’ll match you scores, here … !

º        On a more SERIOUS note … ?   I’m going to have to look up that other post: it sounds rather good … !   (You know, I’m blowed if I can remember where I read it, but BBC America were supposed to be doing something for the 50th anniversary.   I’ll try and Tweet/FB it to you, if I can dig it up … !)

Tuesday, 29 January 2013

The Daily Teaser — 29-1-2013

Well, it’s official: I’ve actually had a damn good night’s sleep, and am ready to see what the day brings.

OK, that’s not going to be much, on my money.

But, if nothing else … ?   I can make me way up to the local library.

Just to get some exercise, you understand.

I’ve actually managed to start reading Terry Pratchett’s Dodger: so I won’t be borrowing anything, just yet … !

That should give me enough time to pick and choose something … !

Let’s get moving on, shall we?

Yes, let’s … !

~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers.   Along with admitting that history can get depressing, at times, she also bagged 6 — or possibly 5·5 — out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 29th January saw the first publication of Poe’s The Raven.   In which New York newspaper … ?
Q2) More to the point, in which year was this … ?
Q3) 29th January, 1856, saw Queen Victoria institute the Victoria Cross.   It’s usually announced in the London Gazette: with one exception.   Whom … ?
Q4) During World War 1, 29th January, 1916, saw Paris bombed by what kind of German aircraft … ?
Q5) 29th January. 1976, saw the West End of London bombed by which terrorist group … ?
Q6) And finally … 29th January, 1819, saw Sir Stamford Raffles land on which island … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 28th January, 1624, saw Sir Thomas Warner found the first British colony in the Caribbean: on which Caribbean island … ?   
A1) Saint Kitts.
Q2) Which country is that island part of … ?   
A2) The Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis.   (It’s the smallest sovereign state in the Americas, seemingly.)
Q3) 28th January, 1932, saw Japanese armed forces attack Chinese city … ?   
A3) Shanghai.
Q4) More to the point, name either of the two versions of Chinese, spoken in that city …    
A4) Mandarin, the official language of China, and Shanghainese, a dialect of Wu Chinese.
Q5) 28th January, 1813, saw the first publication of Pride and Prejudice.   Who wrote Pride and Prejudice … ?   
A5) Jane Austen.
Q6) And finally … 28th January, 1878, saw the oldest college paper in the USA: the what Daily News … ?   
A6) Yale Daily News.
As it’s former Gap Band frontman, Charlie Wilson’s birthday, today, I’ll leave you with their big UK hit … 


And with this quote from the late W. C. Fieldsº …
“I didn’t squawk about the steak, dear. I merely said I didn’t see that old horse that used to be tethered outside here.”
W. C. Fields  January 29, 1880 – December 25, 1946
Enjoy the day.









*        You’re right, Debbi, it can be: saying that, I’ve got an documentary on, that I recorded last night: about the Muisca.    It seems some of their rituals were the basis of the rumours of El Dorado.

º        He obviously shopped at Tesco … 

Monday, 28 January 2013

The Daily Teaser — 28-1-2013

Well, here we go: it’s another fresh, shiny, new week.

Well … 

Shinyish.

I have to admit, the job-hunt isn’t getting any easier.   Especially in the weeks after Christmas.

Still … One can but keep trying.   The one thing that does rankle … ?   Is not having the cash to afford driving lessons: the simple ability to drive would come in very handy.

And would definitely impress a certain young man of my acquaintance … 

video

Let’s get moving on, shall we?

Yes, let’s … !

~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: along with admitting the Holocaust always touched a nerve for her, as well, she also managed to bag 7 out of 7.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Teaser.   Here it is, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 28th January, 1624, saw Sir Thomas Warner found the first British colony in the Caribbean: on which Caribbean island … ?
Q2) Which country is that island part of … ?
Q3) 28th January, 1932, saw Japanese armed forces attack Chinese city … ?
Q4) More to the point, name either of the two versions of Chinese, spoken in that city … 
Q5) 28th January, 1813, saw the first publication of Pride and Prejudice.   Who wrote Pride and Prejudice … ?
Q6) And finally … 28th January, 1878, saw the oldest college paper in the USA: the what Daily News … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and and answers …
Q1) 27th January is Holocaust Memorial Day, internationally and in the UK, marking the date the Auschwitz concentration camp was liberated.   In which year of the World War Two was this … ?   A1) 1945.
Q2) More to the point, in which modern country was Auschwitz … ?   A2) Poland.
Q3) ‘Holocaust’ is, of course, the Jewish name for what happened in the Camps.   What is the Romani name for the Holocaust … ?   A3) The Porajmos, or Devouring.
Q4) Who — in Auschwitz and other camps — were forced to wear pink triangles … ?   A4) Gay prisoners.
Q5) What name did the Nazis give to their victims’ mass killing … ?   A5) The Final Solution to the Jewish Question.
Q6) What’s the legal term for this type of mass murder … ?   A6) Genocide.
Q7) And finally … which Asian country’s genocide court is still prosecuting members of the Khmer Rouge … ?   A7) Cambodia’s.
Enjoy those, everyone.

I’ll leave you with this quote from artist, Jackson Pollock …
“When I am in my painting, I am not aware of what I’m doing. It is only after a short of ‘get acquainted’ period that I see what I have been about.”Jackson Pollock, January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956
And — celebrating Ronnie Scott’s birthday — here’s a tune from him.












*        I’ve got to be honest, Debbi, I think the older I get, the nastier — and more depressing — the Holocaust seems.   The mild irony is that we — as a Brit and an American — have historical links to them: the term originated during the Second Boer War, when the UK used them to confine detainees.   there’s ALSO links to the US treatment of Native Americans, in the 1830s.

Sunday, 27 January 2013

Sunday Lunch

You know, that’s one good thing about the weather.

I mean, apart from the fact it’s been a bit blowy, it’s been nice enough to walk over to Mum's for Sunday lunch; oh, and to see how my nephew, Jude, is doing.

He’s sleeping like a baby.

Bless ’im … !

The Daily Teaser — 27-1-2013

You know, there’s one HUGE problem with getting the early night that I got, last night.

I forgot to put my alarm on: I hate doing that … !

And having a congested nose to go with it.

At least, a congested nostril.   Just the one.   Why on Earth is it, when you get a blocked nose, it’s inevitably just the one nostril that gets blocked … ?

One of life’s little  mysteries, I think … 

Let’s move on, shall we … ?

Yes, let’s … 

~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi putting in her answers: along with telling us she be keeping us posted on the website redesign, also bagging 9 out of 10*.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Holocaust Memorial Dayº questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video

Q1) 27th January is Holocaust Memorial Day, internationally and in the UK, marking the date the Auschwitz concentration camp was liberated.   In which year of the World War Two was this … ?
Q2) More to the point, in which modern country was Auschwitz … ?
Q3) ‘Holocaust’ is, of course, the Jewish name for what happened in the Camps.   What is the Romani name for the Holocaust … ?
Q4) Who — in Auschwitz and other camps — were forced to wear pink triangles … ?
Q5) What name did the Nazis give to their victims’ mass killing … ?
Q6) What’s the legal term for this type of mass murder … ?
Q7) And finally … which Asian country’s genocide court is still prosecuting members of the Khmer Rouge … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 26th January saw India become a republic: in which year of the 1950s … ?   
A1) 1950.
Q2) More to the point, how is this known in India … ?   
A2) Republic Day.
Q3) Who was sworn in as its first president … ?   
A3) Rajendra Prasad.
Q4) 26th January, 1965, saw WHAT named as an official Indian language … ?   
A4) Hindi.
Q5) India has many constitutionally recognised regional languages: in what it calls its 8th Schedule.   How many of these languages are there .… ?   
A5) 22.   That’s on top of Hindi, English, and lord knows how many others recognised at a state level.
Q6) What’s the general international nickname for India’s flamboyant film industry … ?   
A6) Bollywood: although strictly speaking, that’s the Hindi language industry, operating out of Mumbai.
Q7) What’s India’s currency … ?   
A7) The Rupee.
Q8) Ajay Bhatt — Indian-American computer engineer — famously co-designed what: the mouse, the optical drive or the USB socket … ?   
A8) The USB socket.
Q9) Which famous Indian sportsman was the first batsman to score 10,000 runs in one day cricket … ?   
A9) The Little Master, himself, Sachin Tendulkar.
Q10) And finally … Which renowned sitarist died in December of 2012 … ?   
A10) Pandit Ravi Shankar.
I’ll leave you with this very relevant quote from Elie Weisal …
“For the dead and the living, we must bear witness.”
Elie Wiesal
And with Dachau Song: written by Jura Soyfer and Herbert Zipper … 








*        You know, Debbi, I’m going to have to head over and have a look, I really am … !

º        I have to admit, I found this one rather emotional to write.   I think whatever ones political views of Israel, I believe Germany’s Nazi regime committed some of the greatest evils — which is always a debatable term, I know — in history.

Saturday, 26 January 2013

The Daily Teaser — 26-1-2013: India’s Republic Day

You know, it’s not THAT often I get an early night.

But I have to admit, I got one, last night.

Curled up with Ben Miller’s It’s Not Rocket Science, if you must know.

That, after a day’s jobhunting: and having caught the first episode of Game Of Thrones on Pick TV, this week.   Glad to see the hit series come to terrestrial tv: I can see what all the fuss is about … !

Let’s get moving on, shall we?

Yes, let’s … 

~~~~~~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi putting in her answers: happily admitting she’s flattered to be considered a lifeline, but also busily writing and re-designing*, she also managed to bag 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Republic Day questions: here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video … 

Q1) 26th January saw India become a republic: in which year of the 1950s … ?
Q2) More to the point, how is this known in India … ?
Q3) Who was sworn in as its first president … ?
Q4) 26th January, 1965, saw WHAT named as an official Indian language … ?
Q5) India has many constitutionally recognised regional languages: in what it calls its 8th Schedule.   How many of these languages are there .… ?
Q6) What’s the general international nickname for India’s flamboyant film industry … ?
Q7) What’s India’s currency … ?
Q8) Ajay Bhatt — Indian-American computer engineer — famously co-designed what: the mouse, the optical drive or the USB socket … ?
Q9) Which famous Indian sportsman was the first batsman to score 10,000 runs in one day cricket … ?
Q10) And finally … Which renowned sitarist died in December of 2012 … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 25th January, 1759, saw the birth of Scotland’s much loved poet,  Robert Burns.   He’s also know as the Bard of where: Ayrshire, Aberdeenshire or Fife … ?   A1) Ayrshire.
Q2) His first poem, Once I lov’d a Bonnie Lass, was inspired by a coworker called what: Amelia Pond, Nelly Kilpatrick or Elspeth MacDonald … ?   A2) Nelly Kilpatrick.   (I made Elspeth up: and Amelia Pond … that’s Karen Gillan!!!!!)
Q3) In an STV poll in 2009, Burns was named as the The Greatest Scot: narrowly beating whom … ?   A3) William Wallace.   (Who doesn’t look a BIT like Mel Gibson)
Q4) Which John Steinbeck novel takes its name from a Robert Burns poem … ?   A4) Of Mice And Men.
Q5) More to the point … which poem … ?   A5) To A Mouse.
Q6) And finally … what was the first country to issue memorial Burns stamps … ?   A6) The USSR: what’s now Russia.
As it is Republic Day … ?

I can live you with this quote from Mark Twain
“India has 2, 000, 000 gods, and worships them all. In religion all other countries are paupers; India is the only millionaire.”Mark Twain
With a bit of Bollywood to brighten the day up … 


Have good day, folks: especially if you’re celebrating Republic Day!









*        Oh, you’ll have to let me know how the redesign’s going, Debbi!

Friday, 25 January 2013

The Friday Question Set — 25-1-2013

You 'know, I don’t know if any of my regular Friday Question readers have read my Daily Teasers, but I thought I’d a) mention them and b) mention the fact that today’s is themed.

It’s the 25th, today: which means it’s Burns Night, for those of us of a non-Scottish persuasion.

At any rate, hopefully, people will feel free to give it a go: have fun if you do … !

Now: let’s move on, shall we?

After all, today is Friday, which means it’s time for the Friday Question Set.

Here it is, complete with the usual License … 

Online 187
ROUND ONE.   GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Q1) Mg is the chemical symbol for which metal?   
A1) Magnesium.

Q2) Ranidaphobia is a fear of what?   
Q2) Frogs.

Q3) Lord Lucan spent most of his inheritance in which casino?   
A3) The Clermont Club.

Q4) Thimphu is the capital of which Tibetan nation?   
A4) Bhutan.

Q5) R.G. Hardie and Sons are the Queens official suppliers of which musical instrument?   
A5) Bagpipes.

Q6) Which entertainer married his manager, Cheryl St. Clair?   
A6) Michael Barrymore.

Q7) The Old English word ‘acre’ means what in modern English?   
A7) Field.

Q8) Where is the tomb of Henry 8th?   
A8) Saint George’s Chapel, Windsor.

Q9) The current version of Windows is called Windows 8: the current version of the Apple Mac’s operating system is named after which big cat?   
A9) The Mountain Lion.

Q10) What is a Death Cap?   
A10) A poisonous toadstool.

ROUND TWO.   ROUND BRITAIN.   

Q11) The Houses of Parliament are in which London palace?   
A11) The Palace of Westminster.

Q12) Which English city was originally known as Sarum?   
A12) Salisbury.

Q13) Opened in 2000, what was the name of London’s first new river crossing for 100 years?   
A13) The Millennium Bridge.

Q14) How far is it in miles from Penzance to Dover?   
A14) 266.

Q15) Which World War II cruiser is moored today at Symon’s Wharf in London?   
A15) HMS Belfast.

Q16) Which castle is the home of the Northern Ireland Assembly?   
A16) Stormont Castle, Belfast.

Q17) Which country cricket team plays at Old Trafford?   
A17) Lancashire

Q18) Alongside Leinster, Munster and Ulster, which is the fourth province of Ireland?   
A18) Connacht (also spelt Connaught).

Q19) Which English cathedral has a Bell Harry Tower?   
A19) Canterbury Cathedral.

Q20) In which English county is the RAF base Biggin Hill?   
A20) Kent.

ROUND THREE.   BY THE NUMBERS.   

Q21) No number between one and 99 contains the letter A: true or false?   
A21) True.

Q22) Which number in the National Lottery is chosen less often than any other?   
A22) 13.

Q23) In George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, what is the name of the room in which people are tortured by their greatest fear?   
A23) Room 101: The story goes that the number was the same as that of the room at Broadcasting House in which Orwell had to endure many boring meetings when working for the BBC. 

Q24) In Roman numerals, which number is represented by the letter M?   
A24) 1,000.

Q25) How many Horsemen of the Apocalypse are there?   
A25) Four.

Q26) In The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, what is the answer to life, the universe and everything?   
A26) 42.

Q27) What was US murderer John Dillinger known as?   
A27) Public Enemy Number One.

Q28) By what number do members of the Royal Navy refer to their working dress?   
A28) Number eights.

Q29) What number refers to an ice-cream with a chocolate flake stuck in it?   
A29) 99.

Q30) According to the Bible, what is the Number of the Beast?   
A30) 666.

ROUND FOUR.   AT THE 90’S MOVIES.   

Q31) Blues Brothers: 2000 was released in which year?   
A31) 1998.

Q32) Which controversial 1992 Australian film brought future star Russell Crowe to the attention of Hollywood?   
A32) Romper Stomper.

Q33) Who starred as convicted hard man, Riddick, in 1999’s Pitch Black?   
A33) Vin Diesal.

Q34) Which real life ex con and crime writer played Mr Blue in 1991’s Reservoir Dogs?   
A34) Eddie Bunker.

Q35) The acclaimed 1962 short film La Jetèe inspired which time travelling science fiction thriller from 1995?   
A35) Twelve Monkeys.

Q36) Which 1991 road movie featured Brad Pitt in a supporting role as small time thief JD?   
A36) Thelma & Louise.

Q37) How many Oscars were won by box office smash Titanic?   
A37) 11.

Q38) Which 70’s icon played Wesley Snipes’ gruff sidekick and mentor in 1998’s Blade?   
A38) Kris Kristofferson.

Q39) Robert De Niro played real life gangster Sam ‘Ace’ Rothstein in which 1995 mob drama?   
A39) Casino.

Q40) Director Peter Jackson preceded his Lord of the Rings trilogy with which 1996 supernatural comedy thriller?   
A40) The Frighteners.

ROUND FIVE.   CRIME AND PUNISHMENT.   

Q41) How did Frederick West take his own life?   
A41) By hanging.

Q42) In which US city was John Lennon shot?   
A42) New York.

Q43) Which Kray twin was first to die, Ronnie or Reggie?   
A43) Ronnie.

Q44) Which Nick got nicked, for the Barings Bank collapse?   
A44) Nick Leeson.

Q45) In which decade was the Great Train Robbery?   
A45) The 1960s.

Q46) In the US, which Charles led his ‘Family’ during a series of ritualistic killings?   
A46) Charles Manson.

Q47) Which Arsenal boss got the boot, after receiving a bung?   
A47) George Graham.

Q48) What was the other nickname for Jack the Ripper?   
A48) Leather Apron.

Q49) How many people sit on the usual English jury?   
A49) 12.

Q50) Notorious Nazi war criminal Rudolf Hess spent the last decades of his life in which prison?   
A50) Spandau.

ROUND SIX.   GENERAL IGNORANCE.   

Q51) Your So Vain, by Carly Simon, is allegedly about which movie star?   
A51) Warren Beatty.

Q52) Which pre-decimal British coin had a value of 2 shillings?   
A52) Florin.

Q53) Which cathedral appears on the back of the £20 note (as first issued in 1999)?   
A53) Worcester Cathedral

Q54) What may be decorated in the Doric, Ionic or Corinthian manner?   
A54) Pillars: or columns.

Q55) Who was the only man to become Vice-President and President of the USA without being elected to either post?   
A55) Gerald Ford.

Q56) Which London museum based in Covent Garden closed in January 2007 due to lack of funds?   
A56) The Theatre Museum.

Q57) From which Broadway show comes the song ‘Bewitched’?   
A57) Pal Joey.

Q58) Which battle began on 1st July, 1916?   
A58) The Battle of the Somme.

Q59) In the nursery rhyme, who marched his men to the top of the hill?   
A59) The Grand Old Duke of York.   The rhyme is thought to refer to a brief invasion of the Netherlands staged by British forces in 1793. The hill in the rhyme is probably that on which the town of Cassel stands in the middle of the otherwise flat Flanders countryside.

Q60) Which doctor married Billy Connolly?   
A60) Pamela Stephenson.

Enjoy that lot: I hope they help …