Thursday, 31 October 2013

Evil Rising: AKA Sauna.

31st October, 2013.

You realise it’s Halloween, don’t you … ?

I hope so: today’s Halloween themed Teaser would’ve been a complete waste of time if it wasn’t …!

Actually … ?

The same could have been said about my sudden desire to rent a film from iTunes, tonight.

It HAS to be said, I was in the mood for something … 

Well, if not horrific, then certainly something grim.

I think I can say I found that, alright.

The Antti-Jussi Annila directed piece that, in assorted different territories, is Sauna.   Or Filth.

Or, possibly more portentously than it deserves, Evil Rising.

Hmmm … 

Let’s see if we can chew this one through, shall we?

~≈Î≈~

Set in 1595, Evil Rising sees Ville Virtanen and Tomi Eronen as brothers, Eerik and Knut: a pair who’ve been assigned to a small group commissioned to map — and thus settle — the borders between Sweden and Russia, in the wake of an especially bloody war.

The brothers are cynical about their Russian colleagues: and have mixed feelings about the war they’ve lived through.   Eerik, the elder brother, relatively hard-nosed about the things he, as a cavalry leader has done: and Knut, his bookish younger brother, feeling a mixture of regret and self-loathing.

Things only get worse for the brothers, as the pair of them steal food from a farmer and his daughter: killing the farmer, and locking the daughter in a storage cellar, after Knut has raped her.

As they go on, though … ?

As they go on, Knut comes to believe that the group is being followed by the vengeful spirit of the dead young woman.

It’s only when they come to a small Finnish-occupied village in the middle of a swamp, RIGHT in the middle of the most disputed part of the border that things get worse.

Right on the borders of the village, of course … 

Is the traditional sauna.

Traditional … and very creepy looking, sauna … 


You can tell that doorway’s going to be important, can’t you … ?

~≈Î≈~

Now … 

Is Evil Rising a good film … ?   

I’d say so.   Granted, sub-titled films aren’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea*.

But, if I can be frank, here … ?   Evil Rising actually left me thinking that I should sit down one night, and watch it, again.   It genuinely seems to have more to offer: and more that I, in my ignorance of the parts of Europe involved, wouldn’t have spotted first time around.

It had me thinking that my ignorance of those parts of the world is something I should correct … 

And use to enrich my pleasure at this film.

Just a thought …
★★★☆



















*      Bit of a nod, there, to @mimuluxArt, who does like a cuppa, first thing in the morning, along side the Teaser … !

The Daily Teaser — 31-10-2013: Halloween … !

You know, I think it’s getting nearer to winter.

No, really … !

I’ve got to admit, I got up this morning: and I think we can say I was certainly the heat.

Or LACK of heat, at any rate.   Nothing a dressing gown can’t deal with.

But it certainly brings the question that’s on everyone’s lips this year — heating or eating? — into very sharp focus.

Still, I’m hoping this winter won’t be too bad.   Hopefully … !

Let’s get a move on, shall we?

~≈$≈~

Yesterday’s teaser saw no-one putting in their answers.

So, without much further ado, let’s see how everyone does with today’s Halloween questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) Which country celebrates The Day of The Dead, in place of Halloween?
Q2) In Scotland, what vegetable is a Jack O’Lantern traditionally made from?
Q3) According to the saying, what exactly is “…9 parts of the law”?
Q4) Parts of which hit album was used as a theme for The Exorcist … ?
Q5) Which iconic British rock star appeared in vampire movie, The Hunger?
Q6) Which of that artist’s albums featured a song called Scary Monsters?
Q7) What — in Jewish folklore — is the name of the monstrous creature made of clay … ?
Q8) What ghostly Wagnerian ship is said to sail the seven seas?
Q9) Which former US president is said to haunt the White House?
Q10) And finally … what name is given to an apprentice printer … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 30th October, 1981, saw Nicholas Reed — secretary of Britain’s pro-euthanasia group, Exit — jailed for two and a half years.   For aiding and abetting what … ?
A1) Suicide.
Q2) 30th October, 1863, saw George 1st assume his throne, as King Of The Hellenes: effectively becoming king of where … ?
A2) Greece.
Q3) 30th October, 2005, saw the reconsecration of the Fraunkirche, in Dresden.   The church had been destroyed in which World War?
Q4) 30th October, 1991, saw a Middle East peace conference opened by George Bush.   In which European country?
A4) Spain.   (In Madrid, in fact)
Q5) Finally … 30th October saw the first patent granted, for a ball point pen.   In which year of the 1880s … ?
A5) 1888.
I’ll leave you with this line from the Bard …
‘Tis now the very witching time of night,
When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
Contagion to this world.’
~William Shakespeare.
And this tune … 


Oh, and this … !


Oh, and I can’t NOT play this … 


Enjoy your day … 

Wednesday, 30 October 2013

The Brentwood Gazette’s Weekly Teaser — 30-10-2013

You like music, don’t you … ?

I can tell, you know.

I’m going on the assumption you do, any way: happily tapping a foot along to whatever tunes happen to be on the iPod/walkman/jukebox/what-have-you.

Personally … ?

I’ve got the suitably strange Canyons Of Your Mind on, by the Bonzo Dog Do-Dah Band.


But the playlist started — appropriately enough, as it’s Halloween, tomorrow — with White Noise’s An Electric Storm In Hell.


Which reminds me: as it’s ALMOST Halloween, I’ll offer you this week’s Brentwood Gazette Teaser: covered by the usual Creative Commons License* … 
Q1) The ‘Day of The Dead,’ is the Halloween celebration: in which central American country?
Q2) According to the saying, what is “…nine parts of the law’?
Q3) Which district of London did Jack the Ripper terrorise?
Q4) In which area of the US is Steven King resident; New England, the Deep South, or the Mid-west?
Q5) Which former president is said to haunt the White House?
Q6) Mary Shelley was on holiday, when she wrote her most famous gruesome story:   In which European country?
Q7) What was it called?
Q8) Which band had a hit with ‘Grimly Fiendish’?
Q9) Loup Garou is an old French term for what: vampires, werewolves or ghosts?
Q10) In ‘The Munsters’: who was the hideously deformed member of the family … ?
And here’s last week’s questions and answers …
Questions.
Q1) 23rd October saw the first meeting of the Parliament of Great Britain.   In which year of the 1700s … ?
Q2) More to the point, name either of the Parliaments it replaced … ?
Q3) Those parliaments were replaced by laws called the Acts of what: onion, bunion or union … ?
Q4) In which Royal Palace did the Parliament of Great Britain meet … ?
Q5) More to the point, the House Of Commons meets in what was Saint Stephens’ … what … ?
Q6) The Parliament of Great Britain was eventually replaced by the Parliament of where … ?
Q7) More to the point, in which year was this … ?
Q8) The latter parliament was formed when which Kingdom’s Parliament joined up … ?
Q9) The House Of Commons is the Lower House of Parliament, in all its various forms: what’s the upper house called … ?
Q10) Finally … What’s the emblem of Parliament … ?
Answers.
A1) 1707.
A2) Those of England and Scotland.
A3) Union.
A4) The Palace of Westminster.
A5) Chapel.   (All that’s left of the original Chapel is Saint Stephen’s Entrance.   Careful … !)
A6) The Parliament of the United Kingdom.
A7) 1800.
A8) The Parliament of the Kingdom of Ireland.
A9) The House Of Lords.
A10) A crowned, heraldic, portcullis.
Enjoy those: links are on the Gazette’s own site.

I’ll catch you AFTER the little blighters have scared me to death … 















*        Regulars will know already, but for newcomers … all it means is that you’re free to copy, use, alter and build on each of my quizzes: including the Teasers, Gazette Teasers and the Friday Question Sets.   All I ask in return is that you give me an original authors credit on your event’s flyers or posters, or on the night: and, if you republish them, give me an original authors credit AND republish under the same license.   A link back to the site would be appreciated.

The Daily Teaser — 30-10-2013

It’s official.   It’s now — notionally — nose to the proverbial grindstone time.

Although the grindstone, this time, is the job-hunt that those of us in my shoe keep doing.

Something I can only keep banging away at.

Saying that … ?

Saying that, I’m keeping my eyes on the idea of self publishing.   Although some of the help offered by the Work Programme seems to be the equivalent of giving me a 10’ ladder, when I actually just need a step-stool!

Oh, well, needs must, and all that … !

Let’s get a move on, shall we?

~≈ñ≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: along with telling us she liked yesterday’s tune, ALSO bagged six out of six.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ license and video … 

Q1) 30th October, 1981, saw Nicholas Reed — secretary of Britain’s pro-euthanasia group, Exit — jailed for two and a half years.   For aiding and abetting what … ?
Q2) 30th October, 1863, saw George 1st assume his throne, as King Of The Hellenes: effectively becoming king of where … ?
Q3) 30th October, 2005, saw the reconsecration of the Fraunkirche, in Dresden.   The church had been destroyed in which World War?
Q4) 30th October, 1991, saw a Middle East peace conference opened by George Bush.   In which European country?
Q5) Finally … 30th October saw the first patent granted, for a ball point pen.   In which year of the 1880s … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 29th October saw the first computer to computer link-up over what was to become the Internet.   What was the name of the network linking those two computers.
A1) The ARPANET.
Q2) In which year of the 1960s was this … ?
A2) 1969.
Q3) That network was funded by which US government department: the Department of Defense, Treasury or Education … ?
A3) The Department of Defense.
Q4) What — in web addresses — does HTTP stand for … ?
Q5) The system that provides many internet addresses — IPv4 — means internet addresses consist of a binary number that’s how many digits long: 32, 64 or 128 digits?
A5) 32.
Q6) Finally … a website address is also known as a URL. URL is short for Uniform Resource … what … ?
A6) Locator.
I’ll leave you with this observation from the late Michæl Winner …
“An OBE is what you get if you clean the toilets well at King’s Cross station.”
Michæl Winner, 30 October 1935 – 21 January 2013.
And, as it’s Temptations member, Otis Williams jnr’s birthday, with this tune


Enjoy your day.












*        It did seem appropriate, Debbi. :)

Tuesday, 29 October 2013

The Daily Teaser — 29-10-2013: ’Net AGAIN … !


Well, that’s it: the Saint Jude’s Day Storm is official heading for points, elsewhere.

Although not without having done some damage.

As you can see from the attached photo, one tree in Brentwood High Street — by the old ruins — went down.   As had quite a few others.

I know I noticed a few that had gone down on the way to Basildon, yesterday: including in Shenfield Common.

I kind of wish I’d got off the bus about then: the photos would’ve come out a touch better.

Across the country, people have lost power: and a few, sadly, have lost their lives.

I personally, can only offer my condolences to them.

Still … 

Brentwood, itself, doesn’t seem to have come off to badly.   For which one can only be thankful.

Let’s get a move on, shall we?

~≈Ï≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw a welcomed back Debbi* putting in her answers: along with letting us know she felt sad about the death of the late Lou Reed, ALSO bagged five out of six.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ license and video … 

Q1) 29th October saw the first computer to computer link-up over what was to become the Internet.   What was the name of the network linking those two computers.
Q2) In which year of the 1960s was this … ?
Q3) That network was funded by which US government department: the Department of Defense, Treasury or Education … ?
Q4) What — in web addresses — does HTTP stand for … ?
Q5) The system that provides many internet addresses — IPv4 — means internet addresses consist of a binary number that’s how many digits long: 32, 64 or 128 digits?
Q6) Finally … a website address is also known as a URL. URL is short for Uniform Resource … what … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions ands answers …
Q1) 28th October, 1958, saw Cardinal Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli elected as Pope.   What name did he use as Pope … ?
A1) John 23rd.
Q2) Who was Roncalli’s predecessor as pope … ?
A2) Pius 12th.
Q3) 28th October, 1886, saw President Grover Cleveland dedicate the Statue of Liberty: the Statue is in a harbour in which US city?
A3) New York.
Q4) 28th October, 1962, saw President Kennedy thank Soviet Russia for offering to remove missiles: from which island … ?
A4) Cuba.
Q5) 28th October, 1904, saw Panama establish diplomatic relations with which South American country … ?
A5) Uruguay.
Q6) Finally … 28th October, 1918, saw Czechoslovakia become independent of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.   Name either of Czechoslovakia’s successor states … 
A6) The Czech Republic and Slovakia.
I’ll leave you with this though from J. G. Ballard …
“Twenty years ago no one could have imagined the effects the Internet would have: entire relationships flourish, friendships prosper…there’s a vast new intimacy and accidental poetry, not to mention the weirdest porn. The entire human experience seems to unveil itself like the surface of a new planet.”
J. G. Ballard.
And with this tune … 


Have a good day.


















*      Very true, Debbi, very true.   (Did I ever tell you I bought Transformer, Debbi … ?   You couldn’t be a student in the 1980s, WITHOUT having a copy … !)

Monday, 28 October 2013

The Brave One: Jodie Does Deathwish

27th October, 2013.

Blimey, it’s amazing how distracting Wikipedia and IMDb can be, it REALLY is.

Seriously.

I’ve just managed to get around — with the little iTunes credit I have — to catch a movie.

Jodie Foster in the 2007, Neil Jordan directed, The Brave One.

And have to admit: it’s not until you go through someone’s entry on either site, you realise — ESPECIALLY in the case of Ms Foster — quite how impressive a list of gongs she has.

Well deserved gongs, at that, I think!

Which I believe saying what I’m going to say, all the easier.

The Brave One … ?   Is Ms Foster and co, on some VERY good form.

~≈Ç≈~

28th October, 2013.

Phew … !

That was quite some day: I’ve been to Basildon — as part of The Work Programme I have to attend — and seeing the amount of downed trees en route, was quite something.

Saying that?   Storm St. Jude seems to be on its way out of the UK, having done its damage.

We can, I think, be thankful it wasn’t worse.

At ANY rate … ?   The storm WASN’T what I was telling you about, was it?

No.

No, I was telling you about last night’s film: the 2007, Jodie Foster film, The Brave One.

Foster plays talk show radio host, Erica Bain: a woman who — in the middle of her busy career — is organising her upcoming weeding to long term boyfriend, David (Naveen Andrews).

And at the start of the film … ?   The couple are walking their dog through Central Park, when they’re mugged.

David is killed.   Erica … ?   Left seriously wounded, both physically, and mentally.

After she recovers, Erica tries her hardest both to get herself out of her front door, to get back to a normal life.

Something she finds not helped by the time the police take to try and find her lovers killers: and the initial refusal she receives in trying to buy a gun.

Something that, in her desperation and anger … ?   She eventually buys illegally, from one of Chinatown’s more … ahh … dubious residents.

With results that leave Erica feeling profoundly changed.

~≈Ç≈~

Now … 

Good form … ?

I should say so!

I feel that, between them, Foster, Jordan, et al, have made a wonderfully taut variation on the Deathwish theme.

One that both recognises the need for revenge, AND when to stop seeking it.

Personally?

Personally, The Brave One is one heck of good film.
Go get … !

★★★☆

The Daily Teaser — 28-10-2013

You know, it’s one heck of a morning, don’t you… ?

I mean … Lou Reed’s died, for one thing.

Which is a shame.

What’s more worrying to me … ?   Is the buses.

You know I’m on the government sponsored work programme?   In Basildon … ?

Well, I am: and usually I take the number #9 to get there.

Except, of course, today … ?   Is the Day of the Saint Jude’s Day Storm: complete with rail closures, road closures, ferry closures, falling trees, power cuts, and everything else.



OK, GRANTED you can’t necessarily make those trees out.

But they’re swaying a bit more than I’d expect … 

Hmmm … 

Let’s move on, shall we?

~≈ü≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser was quiet: although regular, Debbi*, did look in to say ‘Hello’.

So let’s see how you do with today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ license and video … 

Q1) 28th October, 1958, saw Cardinal Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli elected as Pope.   What name did he use as Pope … ?
Q2) Who was Roncalli’s predecessor as pope … ?
Q3) 28th October, 1886, saw President Grover Cleveland dedicate the Statue of Liberty: the Statue is in a harbour in which US city?
Q4) 28th October, 1962, saw President Kennedy thank Soviet Russia for offering to remove missiles: from which island … ?
Q5) 28th October, 1904, saw Panama establish diplomatic relations with which South American country … ?
Q6) Finally … 28th October, 1918, saw Czechoslovakia become independent of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.   Name either of Czechoslovakia’s successor states …
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 27th October, 1994, saw the discover of Gliese 229B.   What IS Gliese 229B: a red giant, a planetoid or a brown dwarf … ?
A1) A brown dwarf.   (Although, apparently, it may well be magenta in colour … )
Q2) One year later, 27th October, 1995, saw Latvia apply for membership of what … ?
A2) The European Union.
Q3) More to the point, the Latvian coast is on which Sea … ?
A3) The Baltic.
Q4) 27th October — in a non-leap year — is of the year: the 299th, 300th or 301st … ?
A4) The 300th.
Q5) 27th October, 1968, saw protestors against which war, demonstrating outside the US Embassy in London … ?
A5) The Vietnam War.
Q6) Finally … 27th October, 1995, saw former Prime Minister Bettino Craxi tried and convicted on corruptions charges.   Which European country is he the former Prime Minister of … ?
A6) Italy.   (He wasn’t the LAST PM to end up in court … )
I’ll leave you with this thought from Microsoft founder, Bill Gates …
“The next generation of interesting software will be done on the Macintosh, not the IBM PC.”
Bill Gates born 28th October, 1955.
With this tune from The Shadows … 


And, given Lou Reed’s death … ?   I’ll also leave you with this … 


Have a good day: and don’t get caught by the storm … 












*        I’ll look forward to that one, Debbi … !

Sunday, 27 October 2013

The Daily Teaser — 27-10-2013

Oh, that always confuses me … 

It does.

The simple fact that — every six months — the clocks go forward in Spring.

And back in the autumn.

Of course, the clocks have gone back, overnight.

Something that always vague throws me: although today, it’s only mildly confusing.

I only had to reset the clock on my phone, and my boiler.   Everything else, updated automatically.

It’s those little technological developments I’m thankful for.   It means for a lot less swearing, first thing on a Sunday morning … !

At ANY rate … ?

At any rate … let’s get a move on.

~≈Í≈~

With Debbi off for a while, Yesterday’s Teaser was quiet: with no-one [utting in their answers.

So let’s see how you do with today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 27th October, 1994, saw the discovery of Gliese 229B.   What IS Gliese 229B: a red giant, a planetoid or a brown dwarf … ?
Q2) One year later, 27th October, 1995, saw Latvia apply for membership of what … ?
Q3) More to the point, the Latvian coast is on which Sea … ?
Q4) 27th October — in a non-leap year — is of the year: the 299th, 300th or 301st … ?
Q5) 27th October, 1968, saw protestors against which war, demonstrating outside the US Embassy in London … ?
Q6) Finally … 27th October, 1995, saw former Prime Minister Bettino Craxi tried and convicted on corruptions charges.   Which European country is he the former Prime Minister of … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 26th October, 1863, saw the first meeting of England’s Football Association: in a pub in which English city … ?
A1) London.
Q2) 26th, October, 1994, saw two Middle Eastern countries sign a peace treaty on their borders.   Name either country.
A2) Israel and Jordan.
Q3) 26th October, 1985, saw what returned to native Australian tribes?
A3) Ayers Rock: now better under its native name, Uluru.
Q4) 26th October, 1936, saw electricity generators turned on at a well-known dam on the Colorado River.   WHAT dam … ?
A4) The Hoover Dam.
Q5) Finally … 26th October, 2010, saw the death of Paul the Octopus: an octopus who’d shot to fame predicting the results of matches during which football World Cup … ?
A5) The 2010 World Cup.
Enjoy those.

I’ll leave you with this though from Emily Post …
“Ideal conversation must be an exchange of thought, and not, as many of those who worry about their shortcomings believe, an eloquent exhibition of wit or oratory.”
Emily Post  October 27, 1872 – September 25, 1960.
And, as it’s Marika Kroop’s birthday, I’ll also leave you with this … 


Have a good Sunday … 

Saturday, 26 October 2013

The Daily Teaser — 26-10-2013

You know, THAT was a strange one … 

I have dreams: and nightmares.   It’s not often I remember them, but sometimes I do.

One I had, last night … ?   Was … unnerving, to say the least.   From what I can recall, I was being chased around by zombies.

And ended up stuck in a cupboard.

Why, I don’t know.

I do know it was unnerving: very much so.

Especially when you consider it had me up at three in the morning, feeling rather panicky.

Amazing what the mind can do when you’re sleeping, isn’t it … ?

Let’s move on, shall we?   While we ponder that point.

~≈Ü≈~

Yesterday’s teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and, along with letting us know she’ll be off-line, for a few days, also scoring five out of six.

Given she’ll be off, let’s see how you do with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 26th October, 1863, saw the first meeting of England’s Football Association: in a pub in which English city … ?
Q2) 26th, October, 1994, saw two Middle Eastern countries sign a peace treaty on their borders.   Name either country.
Q3) 26th October, 1985, saw what returned to native Australian tribes?
Q4) 26th October, 1936, saw electricity generators turned on at a well-known dam on the Colorado River.   WHAT dam … ?
Q5) Finally … 26th October, 2010, saw the death of Paul the Octopus: an octopus who’d shot to fame predicting the results of matches during which football World Cup … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 25th October, 1976, saw the Queen open the National Theatre.   On which bank of the Thames is the National Theatre?
A1) The South Bank.
Q2) More to the point, name any of the three permanent theatres that make up the National Theatre.
A2) The Olivier, Lyttelton and Cottesloe.
Q3) 25th October, 2001, saw the retail release of Windows XP.   What was XP short for … ?
Q4) 25th October, 1881, saw the birth of artist, Pablo Picasso.   What European country was he from … ?
A4) Spain.
Q5) 25th October, 1900, saw Britain annex the Transvaal.   In which country is the Transvaal, now … ?
Q6) Finally … 25th October, 1983, saw US troops seize control of which Caribbean island … ?
A6) Grenada.
Enjoy those.

I’ll leave you with this point from François Mitterrand …
“There exists in our country a solid continuity of Bonapartism, where the vocation for grandeur of France, the monarchist tradition, and the passion for national unity, the jacobin tradition get together.”
François Mitterrand, 26 October 1916 – 8 January 1996.
And, given it’s Don Was’ birthday … ?   We’ll let the woodwork squeak … 


Have a good day … 













*        Not for too long, I hope, Debbi … ?   I’ll miss having you here … !

Friday, 25 October 2013

The Friday Question Set — 25-10-2013

You know, a thought has just occurred to me: that I thought I’d share, as I’m here.

Remember, a few months ago, Labour leader Ed Milliband pledging Labour support to a freeze in energy prices?

I do: and have to admit, I like the idea, even though I realise it’s an idea unlikely to see any realisation,

I even highlighted it to my local councillor, Karen Chilvers, as an example of some sort positive thing liberal-democrats could or should be doing.

She stuck to agreeing with her party’s line: that a freeze like that would — as it had in the US state of California, a while back — led to black outs, as energy companies (seemingly) ran out of fuel.

Now, I have to admit to a certain amount of scepticism, there.   After all, I’m certain counter-examples — highlighting where energy price freezes worked, and the associated companies didn’t turn out the lights — could be found, even if I couldn’t find them.

There’s ALSO the suggestion from PM, David Cameron, about changing suppliers: something I feel would help some, but not all of us.   (I know I can’t change companies, for various reasons.)

Either way, I’ve felt SOMETHING needs to be done, by whoever’s in government, to persuade companies to slow down price hikes.

Something’s just occurred to me, though.   Regulation.

Regulation.

Could the government regulate things?   I believe they could: and should.

Now, I don’t know if an energy price cap would work: I really don’t.

But what about a time regulation … ?   After all, what annoys people, I think, is the fact that the energy companies raise prices in winter time: JUST at the time people are starting to turn up the heating and use more electricity.

I think government regulation, directing energy companies only increase their retail prices between — say — March and September, and thus giving people a chance to acclimatise to higher prices, is an idea worth exploring.

~≈◊≈~

At ANY rate, me gibbering on about energy prices is neither here nor there, from where you’re sitting: is it … ?

No, you’re her for the reason a LOT of pub quiz masters are here.

This week’s Friday Question Set.

Here it is: covered by the usual Creative Commons License* …
Online 225
ROUND ONE. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.
Q1) Who was the fourth Emperor of Rome?
A1) Claudius.
Q2) What’s the current minimum age of criminal responsibility, in the UK?
Q2) 10.
Q3) Name any the hosts of The Generation Game.   (Two points for two, three points for all three.)
A3) Bruce Forsyth, Larry Grayson and Jim Davidson.
Q4) How were Athos, Porthos and Aramis better known?
A4) The Three Musketeers.
Q5) What star sign covers the months of December & January?
A5) Capricorn.
Q6) Elton John’s original version of Candle in the Wind was recorded as a tribute to which late Hollywood star?
A6) Marilyn Monroe.
Q7) In the book version of The Wizard of Oz, what’s the name of Dorothy’s pet dog?
A7) Toto.
Q8) In which European country does the Danube reach the sea?
A8) Romania.
Q9) How is an alligator Pear better known?
A9) An avocado.
Q10) Is Gazpacho soup a starter, or a main course?
A10) A starter.
Round 2. The Written Word.
Q11) FF8787 wrote Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less.   How is he better known?
A11) Jeffrey Archer. (Do not accept Geoffrey Archer, he’s a different writer.)
Q12) Which Victor wrote Les Miserable?
A12) Victor Hugo.
Q13) Which fictional barrister referred to his wife as “She who must be obeyed”?
A13) Rumpole of the Bailey. (Accept Rumpole.)
Q14) What gender was Richmal Compton, author of the Just William books?
A14) Female.
Q15) What was the name of the boy, in The Jungle Book?
A15) Mowgli.
Q16) Who wrote Rebecca?
A16) Daphne Du Maurier.
Q17) Stephen King is a native of which country?
A17) The USA.
Q18) Who wrote The Female Eunuch?
A18) Germaine Greer.
Q19) Which author also writes as Barbara Vine?
A19) Ruth Rendell.
Q20) Mario Puzo wrote a crime novel that later became a famous movie, starring Marlon Brando. What was it called?
A20) The Godfather.
Round 3. Science and Technology.
Q21) Which dangerous substance is also known as woolly rock?
A21) Asbestos.
Q22) What part of a car may be either drum, or disc?
A22) The brakes.
Q23) On a standard UK computer keyboard, which letter is furthest left … ?
A23) Q.
Q24) Ted Turner is a well known name, in which industry?
A24) Broadcasting: he’s the owner of CNN.
Q25) William Morris, Lord Nuffield, was the 1st man in the UK to make mass produced what?
A25) Cars.
Q26) Which metal is used in thermometers and dental fillings?
A26) Mercury.
Q27) What, during WW2, did the Manhattan Project develop?
A27) The atomic bomb.
Q28) What — as of 2013— is the world’s largest pharmaceutical company … ?
A28) Pfizer.
Q29) What does a Geiger counter measure?
A29) Radiation.
Q30) What is the name of a computer that links one network, to another?
A30) Router.
Round 4. Sporting Chances.
Q31) On what surface is curling played?
A31) Ice.
Q32) After which horny animal is the Leeds Rugby Super League team named?
A32) Rhinos.
Q33) Is professional Badminton played indoors, outdoors, or both?
A33) Indoors.
Q34) In which Sheffield theatre is the World Snooker Championships held?
A34) The Crucible.
Q35) When Judo was added to the Olympic programme, in which country was it being held?
A35) Japan.
Q36) Which Men’s Wimbledon Champion was born on Billie Jean King’s 23rd birthday?
A36) Boris Becker.
Q37) From which part of New York do the Globetrotters come from?
A37) Harlem.
Q38) How many disciplines are there, in a triathlon?
A38) Three.
Q39) What is the usual surface of the lane, in ten pin bowling?
A39) Wood.
Q40) Peter O’Sullivan commentated on which sport?
A40) Horse racing.
Round 5. Music and Lights.
Q41) Roy Chubby Brown charted with which group, back in 1995?
A41) Smokey.
Q42) Level 42 claimed to have got part of their name from which Douglas Adams novel?
A42) The Hitchhikers Guide to The Galaxy.
Q43) Red, Red Wine was the first number 1 for which group?
A43) UB40.
Q44) Who recorded a version of Crying with Roy Orbison, back in 1992?
A44) kd lang.
Q45) Which of his early hits did Cliff Richard rerecord, with the Young Ones?
A45) Living Doll.
Q46) Song for Whoever was the first hit for which band?
A46) The Beautiful South.
Q47) In which decade were pop music charts first compiled in the UK?
A47) The 1950s.
Q48) What was ‘skipped’, in the lyrics of A Whiter Shade Of Pale?
A48) The Light Fandango.
Q49) Which band had a number 1 hit, with Keep On Running?
A49) The Spencer Davis Band.
Q50) Who had a hit with 54321?
A50) Manfred Mann. (Accept Manfred Mann’s Earth Band.)
ROUND SIX. GENERAL IGNORANCE.
Q51) Who was the sixth actor to play Doctor Who on TV?
A51) Colin Baker.
Q52) Who were Yosemite Sam, & Elmer Fudd constantly trying to shoot?
A52) Bugs Bunny.
Q53) Which world War Two band leader was the first official winner of a Gold Disc?
A53) Glenn Miller.   (For Chattanooga Choo Choo)
Q54) Which creatures name means ‘Wild Man of the Woods’: the Orang Utan, the Chimpanzee or the Gorilla?
A54) The Orang Utan.
Q55) Who invented the Bouncing Bomb?
A55) Barnes Wallis.
Q56) True or False: the Mandrill is the world’s largest species of Monkey.
A56) True.
Q57) If your native language is Magyar, what Eastern European country are you from?
A57) Hungary.
Q58) What two letter word is put in front of the word ‘CAPABLE’ to turn it into it’s opposite?
A58) IN’.
Q59) What’s the largest stringed instrument in a standard orchestra, the ’Cello, the Viola, or the Double Bass?
A59) The Double Bass.
Q60) What famous American was assassinated in Memphis, in 1968?
A60) Dr Martin Luther King.
Enjoy those, folks: I hope they help

Oh, and enjoy the tune …

















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