Saturday, 30 November 2013

The Daily Teaser — 30-11-2013: Saint Andrew’s Day

You know, there’s upsides and downsides to now having a TV signal, there is.

On the upside … ?   It does mean I’m slowly catching up with documentaries and comedy shows I’d not caught, last week.

QI’s a perpetual favourite.   I’ve also got a BBC4 documentary on about the history of the Blues.

On the downside … ?   Is catching the shocking news that, up in Glasgow, a police helicopter’s crashed into a pub called The Clutha.

I can only hope as few lives as possibly are lost, but have a nasty feeling about that.

Hmm … let’s get a move on, shall we … 

~≈Ê≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: along with letting us know about how she became a fan of Dr Who, also scored six out of seven.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Saint Andrew’s Day questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 30th November is Saint Andrew’s Day: name either of the colours which make up the Saint Andrew’s Cross.
Q2) Some of Saint Andrew’s bones are in which Scottish town … ?
Q3) Saint Andrew’s Day was declared a public holiday — for Scotland — in 2006.   By the government of where: Scotland, Wales, England or the UK … ?
Q4) Saint Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, and where else: Prussia, Russia or Romania … ?
Q5) Finally … which island in the Lesser Antilles celebrates Saint Andrew’s Day both as its saints day, AND its independence day … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 29th November saw Atari release the world’s first commercially successful video game.   What game was it?
A1) Pong.
Q2) In which year of the 1970s was the game released … ?
A2) 1972.
Q3) Atari, itself, was based in which US state?
Q4) More to the point, Atari is a Japanese word meaning ‘warning’: and used in which game … ?
A4) Go.
Q5) Atari placed their first coin operated video game in a bar called ‘Andy’s’ … what’s … ?
Q6) The game, itself, is loosely based on which real-world sport: tennis, ping-pong or badminton?
A6) Tennis.
Q7) Finally … what was the name of Atari’s 1976 follow up to its first game … ?
A7) Breakout: designed by Apple co-founder, Steve Wozniak.
I’ll leave you with this anonymous verse …
“Yet still the blood is strong, the heart is Highland,

And we in dreams behold the Hebrides!

Fair these broad meads, these hoary woods are grand;

But we are exiles from our fathers’ land.”
‘Canadian Boat Song, Anonymous’
And with this music … 


Enjoy the day … !














*    Oh, I hate that: don’t you, Debbi … ?   Loaning a book out, and never getting it back … !   (Did I tell you I had a copy of the novelisation of very first Dalek story? LORD knows where that’s got to … !)

Friday, 29 November 2013

The Friday Question Set — 29-11-2013

Hmmm … 

That’s a bit of a pain … 

You’ll know, of course, the the building I live has recently had its communal aerial fixed.

It took my landlords a week to fix it, which was … annoying, let’s put if that way.

What’s more … ?

I think the dock I own — that, in part, connects my iPod to my TV — has been damaged, during the week my TV was off air: I do know it, and the iPod, itself, have been misbehaving, ever since.

Oh, well … 

SOMETHING will crop up, I hope.

~≈†≈~

At any rate, today is Friday.

Which — once again — means it’s time for the Friday Question Set.

Here’s this weeks, covered by the usual Creative Commons License* …
Online 230
ROUND ONE. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.
Q1) What does the ‘E’ stand for, in the acronym, ‘OPEC’?
A1) Exporting. (It’s short for ‘Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries.’)
Q2) In the well known Samuel Beckett play, the two main characters were Waiting For … who?
Q2) Godot.
Q3) Bernard Jewry was the real name of which 70s glam rock star?
Q4) Which Michael was MP for Henley during much of the 80s and 90s?
Q5) Danny McGrain represented Scotland at which sport?
A5) Football.
Q6) Ottawa is the capital of which North American country?
A6) Canada.
Q7) What did Foyles in London, sell?
A7) Books.
Q8) In children’s books, which bear was found at a London station?
Q9) What does a Pina Colada contain: gin, rum or whiskey?
A9) Rum.
Q10) Which word for a duty doctor is also a Latin word meaning ‘place holder’?
A10) Locum.
ROUND TWO. AT THE MOVIES.
Q11) May Day was one of the Bond girls, in which Roger Moore, Bond film?
A11) A View To A Kill.
Q12) In which horror film does Jack Nicholson use the immortal line, “Here’s Johnny”?
A12) The Shining.
Q13) Uncle Buck was the first screen appearance for which child star?
A13) MacCauley Culkin.
Q14) Which movie star directed Psycho 3?
A14) Anthony Perkins.
Q15) A slightly mad ex lover can be describes as a Bunny Boiler. From what movie does the term come?
A15) Fatal Attraction.
Q16) More to the point, which actress played the Bunny Boiler, in Fatal Attraction?
A16) Glenn Close.
Q17) Who’s the current James Bond?
A17) Daniel Craig.
Q18) Who played the doctor who looked after John Merrick, in the David Lynch cult film, The Elephant Man?
A18) Sir Anthony Hopkins.
Q19) Where was Rick’s Café?
A19) Casablanca
Q20) Trainspotting was based on a novel of the same name. Who wrote that novel?
A20) Irving Welsh.
ROUND THREE. WORLD TOUR.
Q21) Which South American city has a Copacabana Beach?
A21) Rio De Janeiro.
Q22) More to the point, how does that city’s name translate into English?
A22) January River.
Q23) Which Middle Eastern capital is known locally as El Qahira?
A23) Cairo.
Q24) What’s the official country home of the US President?
A24) Camp David.
Q25) The Bass Straight separates which two islands?
A25) Australia and Tasmania
Q26) In which European city was Checkpoint Charlie?
A26) Berlin.
Q27) The Dead Sea is on the borders of two Middle Eastern countries. Name one. (Two points for both countries.)
A27) Jordan & Israel.
Q28) The site of ancient Babylon is in which modern country?
A28) Iraq.
Q29) The US Embassy to Britain is in which London square?
A29) Grovenor Square.
Q30) In which European city is the UN International Court of Justice?
A30) The Hague.
ROUND FOUR. THE WRITTEN WORD.
Q31) In which University town is the Bodleian Library?
A31) Oxford.
Q32) In which district did Beatrix Potter live?
A32) The Lake District.
Q33) Uncle Tom’s Cabin argued against what?
A33) Slavery.
Q34) In the US, Webster’s is the most famous example of what?
A34) A dictionary.
Q35) What’s the name of the manservant created by P. G. Wodehouse?
A35) Jeeves.
Q36) More to the point, who was that manservant’s boss?
A36) Wooster.
Q37) Fleance was the son of Banquo: in which of Shakespeare plays?
A37) MacBeth
Q38) Who wrote the novel that the film version of The Godfather was based on? (Extra point for the year it was published in.)
A38) Mario Puzo. (1969)
Q39) Who was the famous birth control campaigner that wrote the book, Married Love?
A39) Marie Stopes.
Q40) Which detective writer wrote The Murder of Roger Ackroyd?
A40) Agatha Christie.
ROUND FIVE. MUSIC AND LIGHTS.
Q41) What was the name of Georgie Fame’s backing band?
A41) The Blue Flames.
Q42) Which US city provided the setting for a Christmas hit for the Pogues, and Kirsty McColl? (Extra point for the name of the song.)
A42) New York. (Fairy Tale of New York)
Q43) According to the hit for the Undertones, what was the first name of My Perfect Cousin?
A43) Kevin.
Q44) Who was the first German band to have a UK number one? (Extra point for either the song, or the year, two points for both.)
A44) Kraftwerk. (1982. Computer Love/The Model.)
Q45) Ginger, Eric, & Jack, formed which 60’s supergroup?
A45) Cream.
Q46) Name Catatonia’s lead singer.
A46) Cerys Matthews.
Q47) According to their 1992 hit, The KLF caught the Last Train to where?
A47) Transcentral.
Q48) What sort of girl provided a hit for Jamiroquai, in 1996?
A48) Cosmic Girl.
Q49) Who recorded the album, Nevermind?
A49) Nirvana.
Q50) Which rapper was the producer for the first album by Mary J. Blige?
A50) Puff Daddy.
ROUND SIX. GENERAL IGNORANCE.
Q51) Which bird lays its eggs in other birds nests?
A51) The cuckoo.
Q52) BMW cars were first made in which European country?
A52) Germany.
Q53) Who was the first Spice Girl to marry?
A53) Mel B. (Scary Spice)
Q54) Which far eastern country was once known as Cathay?
A54) China.
Q55) ASH is a pressure group against what?
A55) Smoking.
Q56) What’s larger, a Magnum of Champagne, or a Jeroboam?
A56) A Jeroboam.
Q57) Which animal might be Fallow, or Red?
A57) A Deer.
Q58) Is a gazebo indoors or outdoors?
A58) Outdoors.
Q59) What name links a god of war, a chocolate bar and a planet?
A59) Mars.
Q60) Which comic did Dan Dare first appear in?
A60) The Eagle.
Enjoy those.

I’ll catch you later.























*        Just so newcomers know … all that means is that you’re free to copy, use, alter and build on each of my quizzes: including the Teasers, Gazette Teasers and the Friday Question Sets.   All I ask in return is that you give me an original authors credit on your event’s flyers or posters, or on the night: and, if you republish them, give me an original authors credit AND republish under the same license.   A link back to the site would be appreciated.

The Daily Teaser — 29-11-2013: ATARI … !

You know, if you’ve been following me for a few days, now, you’ll be aware of the situation with my building’s communal aerial,

MOST of us now have functioning TVs: with three exceptions.   Who, understandably, aren’t happy.

All of my neighbour’s have mentioned compensation.   I agree with them.

And mentioned it in the complaint email I sent.

Circle South Anglia’s Complaint’s Department turned THAT down.

I’m not best pleased … 

And complained about that, too.   Although whether THAT gets any attention, I really don’t know.

At any rate, let’s get a move on … 

~≈#≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and, along with letting us know she’s going to look on Barnes and Noble’s site for An Adventure in Space And Time, also scored five out of five.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions and answers, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ license and video … 

Q1) 29th November saw Atari release the world’s first commercially successful video game.   What game was it?
Q2) In which year of the 1970s was the game released … ?
Q3) Atari, itself, was based in which US state?
Q4) More to the point, Atari is a Japanese word meaning ‘warning’: and used in which game … ?
Q5) Atari placed their first coin operated video game in a bar called ‘Andy’ … what’s … ?
Q6) The game, itself, is loosely based on which real-world sport: tennis, ping-pong or badminton?
Q7) Finally … what was the name of Atari’s 1976 follow up to its first game … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 28th November, 1963, saw Cape Canaveral renamed Cape … what … ?
A1) Kennedy.
Q2) 28th November, 1925, saw the first broadcast from the Grand Ole Opry, from Nashville, Tennessee: what was the station originally called … ?
Q3) 28th November, 1960, saw Mauritania become independent of France.   On which continent is Mauritania?
A3) |Africa.
Q4) 28th November, 1967m, saw horse-racing suspended in the UK: after an outbreak of which disease?
Q5) Finally … 28th November, 1991, saw South Ossetia declare its independence: from where … ?
A5) Georgia.
I’ll leave you with this thought from the Angry Video Game Nerd …
“You could call this the ‘Wooden Age’ of video games, when everything was made of wood, and two people playing tennis looked like two glow sticks batting a square ball back and forth. Yeah, this is before circles were invented.”
From The Angry Video Game Nerd.
And with this rather fun piece … 


Have a good day.









*        I didn’t realise Barnes and Noble did video content, Debbi … !   I learn something new, everyday!   Oh, have you seen Unearthly Child, out of curiosity?   The cast of An Adventure in Space And Time did a reconstruction of one of its key scenes … 

Thursday, 28 November 2013

The Daily Teaser — 28-11-2013

You know, RIGHT now … ?

Right now, I’m glad to have a functioning TV: given the recent problems we’ve had with our building’s aerial.

Which are still ongoing, for some of us*.

On a personal front, front, though?   It means that I’ve had a chance to catch up with the BBC Strange Days series, about the Cold War.

It’s covering the 1980s: strange days, indeed: cold war fear, and even more fearsome hairdos … !

Saying that … ?   Well, it seems that a few UK acts played West Berlin during the period: Bowie’s Heroes went down a storm.


Bring’s back a few memories, doesn’t it?

Let’s get a move on: we can dodge more traffic in Memory Lane, that way … 

~≈Ï≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi† putting in her answers: along with letting us know she couldn’t get through to the BBC’s global iPlayer service, also bagging five out of five.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?  Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 28th November, 1963, saw Cape Canaveral renamed Cape … what … ?
Q2) 28th November, 1925, saw the first broadcast from the Grand Ole Opry, from Nashville, Tennessee: what was the station originally called … ?
Q3) 28th November, 1960, saw Mauritania become independent of France.   On which continent is Mauritania?
Q4) 28th November, 1967m, saw horse-racing suspended in the UK: after an outbreak of which disease?
Q5) Finally … 28th November, 1991, saw South Ossetia declare its independence: from where … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 27th November, 1582, saw the Marriage License issued: for William Shakepeare’s wedding to whom … ?
Q2) More to the point, how old was Will, when his happened … ?
A2) 18.
Q3) More to the point, how old was his bride?
A3) Sources vary: but somewhere between 26 and 27.
Q4) Six months later, Mrs Shakespeare gave birth to her and Will’s eldest daughter: prematurely, at a guess, as shotguns hadn’t been invented.   What was the daughter’s name?
A4) Susanna.
Q5) Finally … in his will, Will willed his second best what to his wife … ?
A5) Bed.

Enjoy those.   I’ll leave you with this observation from actress, Karen Gillan …
“I got the recall, the second audition. That was when I started sweating.”
Karen Gillan, 28th November, 1987.
And — as a nod to David van Day — this song … 


Have a good day.













*        I’ve pinned up a note to the front door of our building: giving the email address that people can complain to.   I hope they do: the more the merrier … !

†        That’s a dratted pain, Debbi, that really is … !   (I know the BBC’s online shop has it: although it’s noticeably priced in pounds, rather than dollars: you’re possibly going to have to hunt it up in the US, I’m afraid.   It is worth the effect, though‡.)

‡        Oh, hang on … wouldn’t you know it, the DVD’s on the US Amazon site … 

Wednesday, 27 November 2013

The Brentwood Gazette’s Weekly Teaser — 27-11-2013: The Crusades

Hmmm … 

You know, the aerial saga could well be carrying on for a lot longer than I’d suspected it load.

Mostly where I’ve managed to put up a note on our building’s main door: to let my neighbour’s know that there’s still problems.

Actually … ?

If you’re one of them you too, can complain to Complaints_SA@circle.org.uk.

Go on: you know you want to … !

~≈Å≈~

At ANY rate, today is Wednesday.   That, of course, means it’s time for this week’s Brentwood Gazette Teaser: here this week’s Crusading questions, covered by the usual Creative Commons License* …
Q1) 27th November saw the formal announcement of the First Crusade.   In which year of the 11th Century … ?
Q2) By which pope: Urban the First, Second or Third … ?
Q3) The crusade was announced at the Council of where: Nîmes, Clermont or Avignon … ?
Q4) The Crusade was in response to a call for help from Alexios I Komnenos: the Emperor of where … ?
Q5) Emperor Alexios need Western help against whom: the Seljuqs, the Seleucids or the Sassanids … ?
Q6) The Crusaders originally headed for which city: Byzantium, Constantinopolis or Istanbul … ?
Q7) On their way to that city, the assorted members of the Crusader armies attacked and killed many Jews.  In which German area: the Rhineland, Saarland or Lower Saxony?
Q8) The First Crusade eventually ended with the reconquest of which Middle-Eastern city … ?
Q9) Which military order of monks was founded as a result of the First Crusade … ?
Q10) Finally … what name was given to the collected Crusader States in the Middle East?

Here’s last week’s questions and answers … 

This coming Saturday sees the fifty anniversary of the start of ‘Dr Who’.   I’m a fan.   You can tell, can’t you … ?
Questions.
Q1) 1963 saw the first airing of ‘Doctor Who’, the  world’s longest running sci-fi show, to date: who was the first actor to play the Doctor?
Q2) That first story was called ‘An Unearthly …’ what?
Q3) What exactly does ‘TARDIS’ stand for?
Q4) More to the point, the Doctor’s TARDIS is permanently stuck in the shape of what … ?
Q5) Which former ‘Coronation Street’ actress played the TARDIS in a 2011 episode?
Q6) Name any of the eleven actors who’ve played the character to date: on TV.
Q7) More to the point, name the one actor to have played the part on film … 
Q8) Who, at least until Christmas, is playing the current, eleventh Doctor?
Q9) What was the name of the first story to feature the Daleks: The Dead Planet, The Daleks or The Mutants … ?
Q10) Finally, and according to the new version of the series, the Daleks fought the Last Great Time War with whom … ?
Answers.
A1) William Hartnell..
A2) An Unearthly Child.   (It’s also been referred to as 100, 000BC)
A3) Time And Relative Dimensions In Space.   (Find me a ‘Doctor Who’ fan who can’t tell you that … )
A4) Police box.
A5) Suranne Jones.
A6) William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee, Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy, Paul McGann, Christopher Ecclestone, David Tennent and Matt Smith.
A7) Peter Cushing.
A8) Matt Smith.
A9) Actually, it’s gone under all three: The Daleks, The Mutants and The Dead Planet, after the story’s first episode.
A10) The Doctor’s own people, the Time Lords.

Enjoy those … !




















*        Regulars will know already, but for newcomers … all it means is that you’re free to copy, use, alter and build on each of my quizzes: including the Teasers, Gazette Teasers and the Friday Question Sets.   All I ask in return is that you give me an original authors credit on your event’s flyers or posters, or on the night: and, if you republish them, give me an original authors credit AND republish under the same license.   A link back to the site would be appreciated.

The Daily Teaser — 27-11-2013: Shakespeare’s Shotgun

Oy … Vey … 

We NOW have a functioning aerial.

Ahem … !

If you’ve been following me for the past few days, you’d’ve probably realised that my building’s communal aerial has been out of action for a week.

Thankfully … ?   Well, thankfully, and after a couple of days hanging around, waiting for a cherry-picker, the aerial’s been fixed.

We can safely say it’s now working: APART from in three flats.

I’m thankful.

But having gone through a week’s blackout … ?

I know I’ve complained to our landlords.   And given the Complaint’s department’s email address to as many of my neighbours as I could find.

Not that I think we’d get some sort of compensation.   But I do think some form of goodwill gesture on Circle Anglia’s part, would ease a lot of tensions.

~≈€≈~

At ANY rate, let’s get a move on, shall we?

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and along with asking me about the BBC’s iPlayer, also scoring four out of five.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Shakespearean questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 27th November, 1582, saw the Marriage License issued: for William Shakepeare’s wedding to whom … ?
Q2) More to the point, how old was Will, when his happened … ?
Q3) More to the point, how old was his bride?
Q4) Six months later, Mrs Shakespeare gave birth to her and Will’s eldest daughter: prematurely, at a guess, as shotguns hadn’t been invented.   What was the daughter’s name?
Q5) Finally … in his will, Will willed his second best what to his wife … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 26th November, 2003, saw the last English flight of which supersonic plane … ?
A1) Concorde.
Q2) 26th November, 1944, saw the birth of singer, Jean Terrell: which band was she a member of, between 1970 to 1973 … ?
A2) The Supremes.
Q3) 26th November, 1949, saw India’s Constituent Assembly present what … ?
A3) India’s first Constitution.
Q4) 26th November, 1953, saw the House of Lords vote to allow commercial TV, in the UK.   What’s the name of the UK’s main commercial terrestrial TV channel … ?
A4) ITV.
Q5) Finally … 26th November, 1965, saw the launch of the Diamant-A rocket, from a facility in the Sahara Desert.   Which European country launched the rocket … ?
A5) France.
I’ll leave you with this line, from the man, himself† …
“The course of true love never did run smooth.”
Lysander, Act 1, Scene 1, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare.
And with one of his sonnets …


Have a good day.














*        Oh, I think I’ve managed to find a reference to the global version, here, Debbi.   It’s the Global version you need to look up.   (I should warn you, though, Debbi, the Wikipedia entry on the iPlayer doesn’t say anything about whether it’s been approved in the US, yet: it seems a lot of cable companies were complaining about it.)

†        If you watch the Teaser video through to the end, I’ve made a very bad visual pun about the quote of the day: the line is, after all, from A Midsummer Night’s Dream … 

Tuesday, 26 November 2013

About The Aerial: It’s WORKS … !

You’ll excuse my getting a little vernacular, won’t you?

I hope so.

At … 

F*cking … 

LAST … !

We now have a functioning — partially — aerial.

Thank GODS for that … !

~≈Ô≈~

I’d best try and sum things up, hadn’t I … ?

A few weeks ago, now, people in the building I live in who use Sky TV’s service, lost their TV signal: as result of damage, it was assumed, of the Saint Jude’s Day Storm on the 28th October, this year.

The Sky signal was lost.

But not the Freeview, free-to-air, signal.

Last Tuesday, we were visited by a contractor — from Rushbrooke Installations, as it turned out — whose’s job it was to check what, if anything, was wrong.   (I should add that I know it was Rushbrooke, as the van’s livery stuck in my mind: the acronym on it, and the van who visited, today, were both identical, and spelt out the name of a well known supermarket.)

Whatever he chap DID, caused all the residents in the building to lose their TV signals: Freeview, as Well as Sky.

I didn’t realise what had happened, at first: the fact a neighbour knocked on my door to tell me she’d lost her TV signal: and ask what had happened to mine.  

It didn’t take long for us to ask around the few other neighbours who were in, to see what had happened to their signal.

And to phone up our landlords, and housing officers, to start complaining.

I’m thankful we did.

Because the repair job was immediately arranged for Thursday 21st.

But couldn’t go ahead.

Because the repair team didn’t have enough scaffolding to reach the roof.

THAT got a collective scream of frustration from people.

However, after phoning our landlords, we were assured that the team would be back on the Monday: with the correct kit: a cherry picker, that the team could use to access the roof.


To be fair, the team got her, at rough half past nine, yesterday morning.

However … ?

Oh, Boy!

However, they STILL couldn’t get to the aerial: as the person who’s car was blocking access for the cherry picker couldn’t be found … !

Ho-HUM!

What they eventually did was leave a note with for the cars owner, and a message with a neighbour, and the intention of coming back, today, to complete the work.

They did.

I NOW have a TV … with an incoming SIGNAL!

~≈Ó≈~

I’m one of the lucky ones.

Because I had a quick chat with the head workman who was here,

It seems the ‘normal’ Freeview signal had been lost, as the cable from the UHF (freeview) aerial to the junction box had been damaged by rainwater.

That the Sky signal had been lost, as the Sky dish had shifted in the wind.

And that — since the storm and until last Tuesday — those of us who had been receiving Freeview had done so, as the Freeview signal had been picked up via the shifted. but otherwise undamaged, Sky dish.

It seems that — for some reason — three flats* had some sort of shorting problem: and they were three flats he and his team couldn’t trace, as the cables were unmarked.

Understandably, those who are still without, won’t be happy.

~≈Ó≈~

Now … 

How am I feeling about this … ?

Frankly, mixed.

I’ll happily confess, I’m happy to find myself with a signal.

I always try and stay in touch with people: both friends and family.

But not working does lead to a certain amount of isolation: and I rely — as I think many do — on a TV set as a form of company.   Being able to hear another human voice is rather reassuring.

On top of that … ?

One or two of my neighbours feel some form of compensation would be a good thing.

I can’t say that I’d phrase it, quite that way,

And I’m very aware that a broken aerial isn’t a life-threatening issue.

I DO think, though, that some show of good will should be shown to us by Circle Anglia.

We do, after all, pay a service charge‡ for communal services like cleaning, repairs, and communal maintenance.

Additionally, Im, and everybody else in the building, is paying a TV license.   For the past week, we’ve ALL had to pay that: because, of course, it’s the TV that the license is due on.

We’ve ALL wasted that money, owning a TV set we couldn’t use.

On top of THAT … !

On top of that, some of my neighbours have bought portable aerials: so they can at least watch SOMETHING.   Others, like me, have used catch-up services to watch TV: and I would ALSO assume, have used up quite a lot of broadband allowance.

All in … ?

All in, I don’t know if my neighbours and me are owed compensation.

I do think some form of good will gesture, to cover those costs, would be appreciated.

Cash for preference.

















*        I now know that one of those flats is the one above me.

‡        I realise I get benefits: so don’t pay that, while I’m out of work.   Mine’s paid by the government: however, that means you, the taxpayer, complain to Circle Anglia.

The Daily Teaser — 26-11-2013

The aerial situation really couldn’t get any sillier: it couldn’t, I swear … !

The team that was going to repair the ærial actually turned up, yesterday.

With all the needed kit.

Including the cherry-picker needed to get to get to the ærials themselves, up on the roof of the building.

They couldn’t actually do the work.

No.

They needed to move a car, so they could get the cherry-picker as close as possible to the building.

But couldn’t: because the owner was at work … !

The ærial situation is getting stupid.   I’m also thinking that Circle Anglia’s failure to let us, its service users, know what’s going on is … … 

Well, let’s call it bad, for the moment, and leave it there.

Let’s move on.

~≈◊≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: along with letting us know she was looking forward to the Dr Who special, also bagging four out of five.

Let’s see how she — and you — with today’s questions, shall we?   Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 26th November, 2003, saw the last English flight of which supersonic plane … ?
Q2) 26th November, 1944, saw the birth of singer, Jean Terrell: which band was she a member of, between 1970 to 1973 … ?
Q3) 26th November, 1949, saw India’s Constituent Assembly present what … ?
Q4) 26th November, 1953, saw the House of Lords vote to allow commercial TV, in the UK.   What’s the name of the UK’s main commercial terrestrial TV channel … ?
Q5) Finally … 26th November, 1965, saw the launch of the Diamant-A rocket, from a facility in the Sahara Desert.   Which European country launched the rocket … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 25th November, 1491, saw a siege start, of the last Islamic city in Spain.   Which city was it: Madrid, Granada or Seville … ?
A1) Granada.
Q2) 25th November, 1973, saw President George Papadopoulos deposed in a military coup: in which European country: Greece, Italy or Albania … ?
A2) Greece.
Q3) 25 years later, 25th November, 1998, saw the government of which European country collapse … ?
A3) Turkey.
Q4) Many years earlier, 25th November, 1936, saw two countries sign the ‘Anti-Comintern Pact.’   Name either country.
A4) Germany and Japan.
Q5) Finally … 25th November, 1981, saw Pope John Paul 2nd appoint Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith: which was notoriously also known as what … ?
A5) The Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition: and also as just the Inquisition.
I’ll leave you with this thought from Tina Turner …
“I’m self-made. I always wanted to make myself a better person, because I was not educated. But that was my dream - to have class.”
Tina Turner, born November 26, 1939
And this tune.


Enjoy the day!














*        Hmmmm … Any idea if BBC America has it’s own iPlayer service, Debbi … ?   If it does, it should be on there.   (I know the UK iTunes stores is doing a hell of a lot of Fiftieth Anniversary stuff: you might just get lucky, there … !)

Monday, 25 November 2013

The Daily Teaser — 25-11-2013

You know, it’s now OFFICIALLY Monday.

Officially.

Which possibly means that we’re due some good news.

Today’s the day — our landlord’s told us — that the building’s aerial is due to be fixed.

I, personally, hope so.

For starters, there’s only so much the BBC’s web-based catch up can do.   It is, after all, a catch-up service: intended for occasional use, instead of full-time use.

Now, I’m off to the Work Programme I have to attend, today: over in Basildon.

I’m hoping, by the time I get home at around Four o’clock, that I can turn on the TV, and watch some TV.

Hoping … but frankly doubtful.

Right, let’s get a move on, shall we?

~≈†≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: along with letting us know her, and her partner, had recorded The Day Of The Doctor, ALSO scored six out of six.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the ‘How To,’ License and video … 

Q1) 25th November, 1491, saw a siege start, of the last Islamic city in Spain.   Which city was it: Madrid, Granada or Seville … ?
Q2) 25th November, 1973, saw President George Papadopoulos deposed in a military coup: in which European country: Greece, Italy or Albania … ?
Q3) 25 years later, 25th November, 1998, saw the government of which European country collapse … ?
Q4) Many years earlier, 25th November, 1936, saw two countries sign the ‘Anti-Comintern Pact.’   Name either country.
Q5) Finally … 25th November, 1981, saw Pope John Paul 2nd appoint Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith: which was notoriously also known as what … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 24th November, 1962, saw the first broadcast of which satirical British TV show … ?
Q2) Which recently deceased journalist and media personality was the show’s main presenter … ?
A2) Sir David Frost.
Q3) 24th November, 2012, saw 112 people killed in a fire in a clothes factory: in which Bangladeshi city … ?
A3) Dhaka.
Q4) 24th November, 1932, saw the opening of the FBI’s Crime lab: in Washington DC.   In which US state is it now located … ?
A4) Virginia: in the Marine Base at Quantico, in fact.
Q5) 24th November, 1991, saw the death of singer, Freddie Mercury: with which band did he find international fame … ?
A5) Queen.
Q6) Finally … 24th November, 1874, saw Joseph Glidden’s major patent finally approved.   What was it … ?
Enjoy those.
“If St. Aloysius had been as I am, he would have become holy in a different way.”
Pope John 23rd 25 November 1881 – 3 June 1963.
And, in memory of the late singer, Kevin DuBrow, this tune … 


Enjoy your day.























*        It’s a good one, Debbi‡: from some of the fan opinions I’ve seen have seriously complemented Matt Smith.   (Oh, and there’s a surprise visitor, at the end.   SPOILERS!!!!!)

‡        Actually, Debbi, did you manage to catch An Adventure In Space And Time … ?   THAT was quite something: I personally feel David Bradley — who played William Hartnell — deserves a BAFTA nomination, to say the least.