Monday, 31 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 31-3-2014: Censorship

Oh, now, HANG ON … !

I’ve got last night episode’s of The Musketeers on: playing it’s way to the exciting series conclusion.

And … ?

Well, I have to admit, I’m glad it’s been commissioned for  a second series.

For starters, I’d like to see how they deal with the loss of Peter Capaldi as Cardinal Richelieu.   He has, after, bagged a BIT of a big job.

And, as a second point … ?

Something that’s that much fun can’t stop yet.

Now when it’s starting to be this much fun … !

~≈∏≈~

Sunday, 30 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 30-3-2014

I think we can safely say it’s now spring.

Officially.

Yep … 

The clocks went forward, last night.

I have to admit: it’s something I find mildly … 

Well, curious, frankly.

I still, for the life of me, couldn’t tell you why we have to do it.

One of these day’s … ?

I’ll figure out — or find — an explanation that makes sense for me!

Now … let’s get a move on … 

~≈$≈~

Saturday, 29 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 29-3-2014: Keep On Running

You know, I like a good read, now and again.

You wouldn’t think so, would you?

But yes, I like a good read.

I’ve also kept half an eye on an on-going news story: restrictions introduced by Justice Minister, Chris Grayling, on the number of books sent in to those in prison.

I personally can’t help but think that that is the stupidest possibly move.

Not just from a rehabilitation view point.

From the little I know, prison officers rarely have time to take inmates to the equally undermanned prison library.

What’s more … ?   A book being sent in by family is a good way of encouraging prisoner literacy, and occupied: and, I believe out of trouble.

And quite possibly, from ALSO joining a riot.

Let’s call a spade a spade, here.   I think Justice Minister Chris Grayling is being an outright idiot, for promoting these restrictions.

~≈®≈~

Friday, 28 March 2014

Tooth And Nail: There’s Better

27th March, 2014.

*Yaaaaaawns* … !

Politely, obviously … 

You know, I do like to rent movies, occasionally.

No, really.

I’ll be frank: I’m job hunting at the mo.

But you knew that, if you’ve been reading this for a while.

You’d also have realised that — occasionally — I’ve enough money put aside to buy an iTunes gift card.

Credit I can eke out on the occasional album.   And — equally — on an occasional film rental: I realise there’s possibly better things to be spending my rare, spare cash on.

But equally, there’s a lot of nasty habits I could be indulging: too much beer, or — ahem — Columbian Marching Powder!

No, I try and rent a movie.

One I can watch*, possibly enjoy, and certainly write about, afterwards.

You’ve possibly noticed that, too, if you’ve been paying attention.

At ANY rate … ?   At any rate, I’ve gone and gone it again: rented a film.

Tonight’s rental … ?   Was the 2007, horror film that is Tooth And Nail.

And much as I’d like to say it’s credit well spent … ?

I’m none too sure if I can … 

~≈Â≈~

The Friday Question Set — 28-3-2014

Well, now, that’s THAT worked out of my system.

Waking up, this morning, thinking it was Saturday, I should say.

Do you get that … ?   Waking up on the morning of — for example — a Friday: in the deep, perfect and absolute knowledge it’s a Friday.

You know perfectly it’s a Friday: your diary — PDA/To-do list/calendar, whatever — is telling you it’s a Friday.

But with a nagging feeling it’s a Saturday … ?

Yeah … 

Me too … 

~≈î≈~

The Daily Teaser — 28-3-2014

Oh, now, I hate that … 

Do you ever get the feeling that today is not the one you know it is … ?

Today’s Friday: I know that perfectly well, I can see it on the calendar time and date thing on the menubar of my screen … 

But for whatever weird reason … ?

It feels like it’s Saturday.

It’s … 

Weird … and annoying … 

Especially when you’ve got an appointment … !

Oy veh … !

~≈Â≈~

Thursday, 27 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 27-3-2014: The Railways

Oooh, but that’s looking exciting … !

I have to admit to following The Tomorrow People for the past few weeks.

And, granted, it’s not perfect — it’s a touch adolescent, and a few story threads haven’t been followed up — but it’s starting to shape up.

To the point where they almost — but not quite — killed off a major character, last night.

OK, it’s not quite Blake’s 7.   But it is fluffy and enjoyable.

Either way … ?   Let’s get a move on … 

~≈Â≈~

Wednesday, 26 March 2014

The Brentwood Gazette’s Weekly Teaser — 26-3-2014: Language Is A Virus

Oh, now that’s a thing … 

I thing I need to pass on a message or two, to Neville the Editor, and the rest of the gang, at the Brentwood Gazette.

I’ve had word an old friend — Kay — is doing something a bit daring for charity.

She’s doing a sky-dive … !

Bless her, you can tell she’s not worried about heights, can’t you … !

I hope it goes well for her.

And ALSO hope she manages to raise a pile of cash for whatever her charity is!

At any rate: as soon as I know more, I’ll let you know.

Let’s move on, though … 

~≈Â≈~

The Daily Teaser — 26-3-2014

You know, I could swear that went off.

I think … 

So you know, I live in a block of flats: one with a set of buzzers at the communal entrance.

There’s one buzzer for every flat.

There’s also a tradesman’s button that postmen, electricians and engineers can use: with an associated timer, so it can only be used before a certain time.

The reason I mention all this … ?

Is simple.

I could’ve SWORN my buzzer — or someone’s, or possibly the Tradesman’s — went off, this morning.

At about twenty past six.

Now I could well have been dreaming.

On the other, if I wasn’t … ?

What on Earth was someone doing, at that time of the morning … ?

Oy, veh … !

~≈Á≈~

Tuesday, 25 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 25-3-2014

Hmmm … 

Now that’s … frustrating … 

You’ve possibly worked out — by now — that I like a movie or two, haven’t you … ?

One of the ones I wouldn’t mind checking out … ?   Is the 1995, Kathryn Bigelow directed, Strange Days.

Me being me, I’ve not much actual spending cash: I’ve enough, every so often, to spend on an iTunes card once in a blue moon, but not much more, beyond that.

So, obviously, I’d like to rent it from the iTunes store: just so I can see if it’s as good as some say.

The fact the DVD’s available on Amazon and Netflix, but not on the iTunes Store … ?

Especially after putting in two separate requests?

Well, that’s frustrating.   And frustrating enough for me to publicly ask Apple what on Earth’s going on.

After all, if Amazon and Netflix have copies of Strange Days, why don’t they … ?

~≈†≈~

Monday, 24 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 24-3-2014

Oh, BLESS ’im … !

Did I tell you I’ve a nephew … ?

Just the one: called Jude.   That’s him, there, with the cars: he’s a BIT of a petrol head … !

And one that’s managed to charm the rocks off his old uncle, as well.

By turning around, last night, as he was off to bed, and saying “You’re my FRIEND, Uncle Paul … !”

Bless him, what do you do with a kid like that … !?!


~≈Â≈~

Sunday, 23 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 23-4-2014

Oooh, HECK … 

When do the clock’s go forward … ?

Today … ?   Or next weekend … ?

I have to admit, I kind of always look forward to the clocks going forward.

If for no other reason than it means I can look forward to saving a few — helpful — quid on my electricity bill.

But I alway forget to check when the clocks change.

Not that it’s necessarily important.

But, my word, it’s helpful … !

~≈Â≈~

But let’s move on, shall we?

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and scoring six out of seven.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?

">video …

Q1) 23rd March, 1933, saw the German Reichstag pass the Enabling Act of 1933: allowing who to effectively be named as Germany’s dictator?
Q2) What’s the name of the current version of the Reichstag?
Q3) 23rd March, 1919, saw Benito Mussolini found the Italian Fascist movement.   In which Italian city … ?
Q4) 23rd March, 1989, saw Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischman announce their discovery of which technique … ?
Q5) 23rd March, 1857, saw the first lift — elevator for my US readers — installed in a tower block.   Who was the New York resident who invented it … ?
Q6) Finally … 23rd March, 1965, saw the launch of NASA’s first two-man space mission: was this Gemini 3, Mercury 4 or Apollo 5?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 22nd March, 1630, saw the Massachusetts Bay Colony outlaw the possession of dice.   How many sides do commonly used dice have?
A1) Six.
Q2) More to the point, the numbers on opposite sides usually add up to what … ?
A2) Seven.
Q3) Equally to the point, what shape is one of those dice?
A3) Cube shaped.
Q4) What shape are four-sided dice … ?
Q5) The Colony also banned playing cards on that day.   How many suits make up the standard, French-style, deck … ?
A5) Four.
Q6) Name one of those suits.
A6) Hearts, Diamonds and Spades and Clubs.
Q7) Finally … which playing card is sometimes called the death card … ?
A7) The Ace Of Spades.
I’ll leave you with Parklife, as a nod to Blur’s usual singer, Damon Albarn … 


And this thought from the late Elizabeth Taylor …
“The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you can be pretty sure they’re going to have some pretty annoying virtues.”
Elizabeth Taylor, February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011.
Have a good Sunday … 













*        I definitely could’ve done with that, I know THAT much, Debbi … !   (Oh, sorry about the score, Debbi.   Strictly speaking, a four-sided-dice is tetrahedral: its faces are triangular, but it isn’t.)

Saturday, 22 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 22-3-2014: Games

I have to admit to liking the odd documentary, I really do.

Or, at least, having one on in the background, while I write.

Right at the moment … ?

Right at the mo, I’ve one I recorded, last night: about Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells album.

The documentary’s very informative.

The album … ?   Is still something to listen to.

If you’ve never heard it, that’s something I suggest you remedy … !

~≈Â≈~

But let’s move on, shall we?

Yesterday’s teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and scoring six out of six.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the How ToLicense and video … 

Q1) 22nd March, 1630, saw the Massachusetts Bay Colony outlaw the possession of dice.   How many sides do commonly used dice have?
Q2) More to the point, the numbers on opposite sides usually add up to what … ?
Q3) Equally to the point, what shape is one of those dice?
Q4) What shape are four-sided dice … ?
Q5) The Colony also banned playing cards on that day.   How many suits make up the standard, French-style, deck … ?
Q6) Name one of those suits.
Q7) Finally … which playing card is sometimes called the death card … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 21st March, 1960, saw 69 unarmed black demonstrators massacred by white police: in the town of Sharpeville.   In which country is Sharpeville?
Q2) More to the point, the demonstrators were protesting against the (then) government’s racial segregation policies.   How were those policies known … ?
A2) Apartheid.
Q3) What was the name of the political party — led by Nelson Mandela  — who opposed the segregation policy for many years.
A3) The African National Congress, or ANC.
Q4) As a result of the Massacre, 21st March was declared as International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination: by which organization: the EU, UN or NATO … ?
A4) The United Nations: or UN.
Q5) In which year of the 1960s was the resolution passed?
A5) 1966.
Q6) Finally … in the country the massacre took place in, the day as now commemorated as what … ?
I’ll leave you with possibly the only song to play, when you mention cards … 


And with this thought …

“God does not play dice with the universe; He plays an ineffable game of His own devising, which might be compared, from the perspective of any of the other players [i.e. everybody], to being involved in an obscure and complex variant of poker in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infinite stakes, with a Dealer who won’t tell you the rules, and who smiles all the time.”
From Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.
Enjoy your day.











*        Oh, did you see the photo Mr S put up yesterday, Debbi … ?   BOY, did that barbecue look good … !

Friday, 21 March 2014

The Friday Question Set — 21-3-2014

Wouldn’t you know it, it’s been one of those Fridays.

No, nothing DRASTIC: just one of those Friday where you don’t apparently, stop!

And even when you do … ?

You realise you’ve still got stuff to catch up with.

Heigh-ho … !

~≈Û≈~

So, I’ll get a shift on, shall I … ?

As it’s Friday, it means that it’s time for the Friday Question Set.

Here’s this week’s, covered by the Creative Commons License* …
ONLINE 243
ROUND ONE.   GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.
Q1) In which decade did Mountain biking become an Olympic event
A1) The 1990s.
Q2) Which was the first country to give women the vote?
Q3) Quarter, quell, quote: which of these words is made from letters on the top row of a keyboard?
A3) Quote.
Q4) In which country would you watch Polonia play a home soccer match?
A4) Poland.
Q5) In the Bible what is the name of John the Baptist’s mother?
A5) Elizabeth.
Q6) Which country did Martina Hingis represent when she first won Wimbledon?
Q7) Collectively,  Bobby Farrell, Marcia Barrett, Liz Mitchell and Maisie Williams were better known as which 70s band?
A7) Boney M.
Q8) What does the Archbishop of York Sign himself as?
A8) Ebor.   (The word’s derived from Eboracum, the Latin name for York.)
Q9) Burt Reynolds was born in which American state?
A9) Georgia.
Q10) How is Vichyssoise soup usually served?
A10) Cold.   I’ll pause here for a Vichyssoise of verbiage … 
ROUND TWO.   MUSIC AND LIGHTS.
Q11) In the 1960s, who had a hit with Can’t Get Used to Losing You?
A11) Andy Williams.
Q12) More to the point, which Ska band covered it, during the 80s?
A12) The Beat.
Q13) Roy Orbison, George Harrison, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne.   Who’s the missing member of the Travelling Wilberries?
A13) Bob Dylan.
Q14) S Club 7’s second number 1 went straight in at the top: what was its title?
A14) Never Had a Dream Come True.
Q15) Tony McCarroll and Gem Archer were members of which British band?
A15) Oasis.
Q16) Which Irish band were the first band to have 4 UK № 1s, in the same year?
A16) Westlife.
Q17) “We Will Rock You” was covered by Queen: working with which band band?
A17) Five.
Q18) Two major rock stars died on July the 3rd, one in 1969, one in 1971: name either.   (Bonus point if you can identify the correct year.)
A18) Brian Jones, in 1969, & Jim Morrison, in 1971.
Q19) Name that tune; - “Here I lie, in a lost and lonely part of town” … 
A19) Tragedy by the Bee Gees.
Q20) During his lifetime, how many UK № 1s did Roy Orbison have?   (Bonus point for telling us his nickname.)
A20) Three.   (‘The Big O’)
ROUND THREE.   COMMUNICATIONS BREAKDOWN.
Q21) What was the world’s first adhesive postage stamp?
A21) The Penny Black.
Q22) What does the abbreviation ‘BT’ stand for?
A22) British Telecom.
Q23) What letters & punctuation marks end many of UK internet addresses?
A23)
.co.uk.
Q24) What’s the BBC’s news channel called?
A24) BBC News.
Q25) Ofcom is the watchdog body for which industry?
A25) Telecoms.
Q26) In communications terms, what is The Washington Post?
A26) A newspaper.
Q27) What does the ‘I’ stand for, in ISP?
A27) Internet.
Q28) What is Reuters?
A28) A news agency.
Q29) In the abbreviation, Rt Hon., what is the Hon short for?
A29) Honourable.
Q30) What does a bottle contain if you see a skull & crossbones on it?
A30) Poison.
ROUND FOUR.   TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRY.
Q31) What was the first country to legalise Trade Unions?
A31) Britain.
Q32) What does the A stand for, in ‘AOL’?
A32) America.
Q33) Which cleaning product did Proctor & Gamble launch, in 1969?
A33) Ariel.
Q34) In the initials, ‘CBI’, what does the I stand for?
A34) Industries.
Q35) Along with Corn Flakes, what cereal did Kelloggs introduce to the UK, in 1922?
A35) All Bran.
Q36) What name is given to an alloy that joins metals together?
A36) Solder.
Q37) The 701 Computer was first put on sale in 1953: which company produced it?
A37) IBM.
Q38) The Red Triangle was the first company trademark to be registered; - which company’s trade mark was it?
A38) Bass Brewery’s.
Q39) Which industrialist became the first Lord Mayor of Dublin, in 1851?
A39) Lord Guinness.
Q40) Which inventor invented and marketed a vehicle powered by a washing machine motor?
A40) Clive Sinclair.
ROUND FIVE.   AROUND THE WORLD.
Q41) On which Indonesian island is the resort of Kuta?
A41) Bali.
Q42) What’s the name of the fault that San Francisco lies on?
A42) The San Andreas Fault.
Q43) What’s the world’s longest mountain range?
A43) The Andes.
Q44) After Alaska, and Texas, what’s the third largest state of the USA?
A44) California.
Q45) Which country has ‘IS’ as its international registration letters?
A45) Iceland.
Q46) In which East European country is Transylvania?
A46) Romania.
Q47) What is a sea containing many islands called?
A47) An archipelago.
Q48) On the London Underground map, what colour is the Bakerloo line?
A48) Brown.
Q49) The volcano of Soufrière is on which Caribbean island?
A49) Saint Vincent.
Q50) What’s the capital of Tasmania?
A50) Hobart.
ROUND SIX.   GENERAL IGNORANCE.
Q51) What type of Schoolboy appears in the title of a John Le Carré novel?
A51) Honourable.
Q52) Cleve Hill is the highest point of which part of England?
A52) The Cotswolds.
Q53) Which song begins, “I see trees of green, Red roses too”?
Q54) True or False.   Barry Sheene was the first person to be a world champion on 2 & 4 wheels?
A54) False.   It was John Surtees.
Q55) In which country did the Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky die?
A55) Mexico.
Q56) In 1919 the Curzon Line divided Poland on what basis, language, ethnicity, or region? 
A56) Language.
Q57) What was founded following the Dumbarton Oaks Conference of the 1940s?
Q58) Who did Cassius Clay beat when he first became world heavyweight champion?
Q59) Who took the Led Zeppelin song, Stairway to Heaven into the charts, first: the Far Corporation, Rolf Harris or Iron Maiden?
A59) The Far Corporation.
Q60) How many chapters are there in the Book of Genesis?
A60) 50.
Enjoy those: I’ll catch you next time … !







*     Regulars will know already, but for newcomers … all it means is that you’re free to copy, use, alter and build on each of my quizzes: including the Teasers, Gazette Teasers and the Friday Question Sets.   All I ask in return is that you give me an original authors credit on your event’s flyers or posters, or on the night: and, if you republish them, give me an original authors credit AND republish under the same license.   A link back to the site — and to the Gazette’s, if that’s where you’ve found these — would be appreciated.

The Daily Teaser 21-3-2014: Sharpeville

Wha …

What on EARTH, just happened there … ?

I was right in the middle of telling you all about the sad death of comic-book writer, Steve Moore.

Who’d worked both on Dr Who Weekly, back in the early days, and on 2000AD: coming up with Abslom Daak for the former, and the format for the Future Shocks strip for the latter.

Which is sad: the guy had an influence on the childhoods of me and many others: and was an inspiration for Alan Moore, genuinely seen as one of the giants of the form.

I was JUST about to offer my condolences to all his family …

When the power gave out for a second or two.

Quite WHY, I don’t know … !

Hmmm …

Let’s get a move on, shall we?

Before it happens again … !

~≈$≈~

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and scoring nine out of ten.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s rather somber questions, shall we?

Here they are, along with the How ToLicense and video

Q1) 21st March, 1960, saw 69 unarmed black demonstrators massacred by white police: in the town of Sharpeville.   In which country is Sharpeville?
Q2) More to the point, the demonstrators were protesting against the (then) government’s racial segregation policies.   How were those policies known … ?
Q3) What was the name of the political party — led by Nelson Mandela  — who opposed the segregation policy for many years.
Q4) As a result of the Massacre, 21st March was declared as International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination: by which organization: the EU, UN or NATO … ?
Q5) In which year of the 1960s was that resolution passed?
Q6) Finally … in the country the massacre took place in, the day as now commemorated as what … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 20th March saw Albert Einstein publish what: his General or Special Theory of Relativity … ?
A1) The General Theory.
Q2) What force does Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity concern: gravity, magnetism or electricity … ?
A2) Gravity.   (The central equations describe the relation between the geometry of a four-dimensional, pseudo-Riemannian manifold representing spacetime, and the energy–momentum contained in that spacetime.   Apparently … )
Q3) Classical physics — when you’re talking about Relativity — usually gets called Galilean relativity: named after which astronomer … ?
Q4) Classical physics gets called Newtonian mechanics, when discussed by quantum mechanics: which Newton is it named for … ?
Q5) Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity talks about the speed of light: which is 186, 282 miles per what: second, minute or hour … ?
A5) Second.
Q6) Name any of the seven colours of the visible light spectrum.
Q7) Can things travel faster than the speed of light … ?
A7) No.
Q8) In Einstein’s famous equation, E=mc², which letter represents light: E, m or c … ?
A8) c.
Q9) Which singer’s eleventh album was called E=mc²?
Q10) And finally … who played Einstein in the film, Young Einstein … ?
I’ll leave you with this thought …
“In 1960 police shot dead 69 demonstrators in the town of Sharpeville. Most of them were black. Most of them were running away as they were fired upon. The incident provoked outrage.”
Michael Gallagher, journalist.
And with this song.



Have a good day.









*        I think a rant’s a good safe bet, Debbi.   I mean, the other alternative’s to grab a gun and go postal: which people tend to frown at … !!

Thursday, 20 March 2014

The Daily Teaser — 20-3-2014: It’s All Relative, M’Dear … !

You know, it look’s like it’s starting to get a touch … 

Well … 

Springy … 

Which means that — if you know how these things go — that yesterday was Budget Day, here in the UK: when the Chancellor of the Exchequer announces government spending plans.

One of them … ?   Was a cap on the nation’s Welfare benefits spending.

Now, I can understand the thinking on that.

But as a job seeker … ?   And on who’s seen more help from the Department of Work and Pensions, in the past month, than he has from the Government’s sponsored Work Programme?

Frankly, I see anything that threatens to cut help for me to find work — especially from a government that wants to actively do the opposite — to be both inherently hypocritical, completely contradictory … 

And something I think will be totally self defeating: especially if it reducing the financial help people like me — who need as much, if not more, help as out of work teens — actually get.

Personally … ?   As Labour plan to do something similar, and Liberal Democrats have not spoken one way or the other, I’m thinking I should quite deliberately spoil my voting paper at both the next European and General elections.

I see no other way of protesting this.

~≈Å≈~

But let’s move on, shall we?

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* putting in her answers: and scoring four out of six.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s Teaser, shall we?

Here it is, along with the How ToLicense and video … 

Q1) 20th March saw Albert Einstein publish what: his General or Special Theory of Relativity … ?
Q2) What force does Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity concern: gravity, magnetism or electricity … ?
Q3) Classical physics — when you’re talking about Relativity — usually gets called Galilean relativity: named after which astronomer … ?
Q4) Classical physics gets called Newtonian mechanics, when discussed by quantum mechanics: which Newton is it named for … ?
Q5) Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity talks about the speed of light: which is 186, 282 miles per what: second, minute or hour … ?
Q6) Name any of the seven colours of the visible light spectrum.
Q7) Can things travel faster than the speed of light … ?
Q8) In Einstein’s famous equation, E=mc², which letter represents light: E, m or c … ?
Q9) Which singer’s eleventh album was called E=mc²?
Q10) And finally … who played Einstein in the film, Young Einstein … ?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 19th March, 1895, saw Auguste and Louis Lumière film some of their first film footage: of workers leaving the Lumière family factory.   In which French city was that factory?
A1) Lyon.
Q2) 19th March, 1649, saw the House Of Commons vote to abolish the House of Lords.   Which of them is the Upper House of Parliament … ?
A2) The House Of Lords.
Q3) More to the point, bishops from which Church are members of the House of Lords?
Q4) 19th March, 1944, saw forces from Nazi Germany occupy which European country: Hungary, Bulgaria or Romania?
A4) Hungary.
Q5) 19th March, 1918, saw the US Congress approve time-zones for the USA.   How many time-zones does mainland USA cover?
A5) Five.
Q6) Finally … 19th March, 1964, saw the British government announce it would be building three new towns in South East, over the next few years.   Name any of the proposed towns.
A6) Milton Keynes, Havant and Basingstoke.
I’ll leave you with this tune from Landscape … 


And this thought …
“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music. ... I cannot tell if I would have done any creative work of importance in music, but I do know that I get most joy in life out of my violin.”
Albert Einstein.
Have a good day.















*        That’s a thought, Debbi, while I’m in a rant mood: you know I’ve come off the Government’s Work Programme, don’t you?   In January.   Complete waste of two years, in my experience.   They actually phoned me a couple of weeks ago, to ask if I’d got a job or some training, after I’d left them.   It seems that, if I do, in the six months after I’ve left their care, they still get paid! Despite not having had to lift a finger … !

Wednesday, 19 March 2014

The Brentwood Gazette’s Weekly Teaser — 19-3-2014: Martian Chronicles!

Looks like today is LITERALLY going to be one of those rushed days!

I need to get this post finished: as well as having completed the Gazette’s version!

AND write the Gazette’s April Teasers.

And more for here … !

And, bless him, my nephew, Jude — who’s three and VERY bossy! — has decided Mummy’s taken him to lunch with his Uncle Paul … !

Oy Veh!

~≈Ê≈~

With THAT said, let’s get a move on, shall we?

Here’s this week’s questions, covered, as ever, by the Creative Commons License* …
Q1) 19th March saw the Mars Odyssey probe start photographing Mars.   How exactly: by thermal imaging, with a visible light camera or by gamma ray spectrography?
Q2) The imaging started in which year of this century: 2002, 2007 or 2012?
Q3) In which year was the probe launched … ?
Q4) Roughly how long is a Martian year: 676 days, 686 days or 696 days … ?
Q5) What name have scientists given to one Martian day: a day, sol or mon?
Q6) One system used by planetary scientists starts the Martian calendar on 11th April of which year of the 1950s?
Q7) Mars has what’s either the largest or second largest mountain in the solar  system, depending on how it’s measured.   What’s that mountain called … ?
Q8) Mars’ atmosphere is 96% what: nitrogen, oxygen or carbon dioxide … ?
Q9) Mars is also known as what: red planet, white planet or blue planet?
Q10) Finally … name either Martian moon …
Here’s last week’s questions and answers …
Questions.
Q1) 12th March saw the first Coca Cola bottling plant opened: in which US state?
Q2) In which year of the 1890s?
Q3) In which US city was the drink first made?
Q4) It was originally sold as French what cola?
Q5) The original recipe called for thirty pounds of what: sugar, salt or pepper?
Q6) Some US retailers managed to create demand for Coca Cola made with cane sugar.   This version is usually exported from which Central American country … ?
Q7) In which year was Coca Cola declared Kosher … ?
Q8) Two halal alternatives to Coca Cola have been made in Europe: in France and England.   Name either.
Q9) In which year of the 1980s was New Coke introduced … ?
Q10) Finally … In which year of the 1960s, did Coke introduce the “It’s the Real Thing” slogan … ?
Answers.
A1) Mississippi.
A2) 1894.
A3) Atlanta.
A4) French Wine Cola.
A5) Sugar.
A6) Mexico.
A7) 1935.
A8) Qibla-Cola and Mecca-Cola.
A9) 1985.
A10) 1969.
Enjoy those.







*        Regulars will know already, but for newcomers … all it means is that you’re free to copy, use, alter and build on each of my quizzes: including the Teasers, Gazette Teasers and the Friday Question Sets.   All I ask in return is that you give me an original authors credit on your event’s flyers or posters, or on the night: and, if you republish them, give me an original authors credit AND republish under the same license.   A link back to the site — and to the Gazette’s, if that’s where you’ve found these — would be appreciated.